Top Stories

first_img Top Stories This story was originally published May 5, 2014, in preparation for that year’s NFL Draft. It has since been edited to reflect new information.The Arizona Cardinals are not exactly used to waiting a while to hear their name called on draft day.Such is life when you’re perennially one of the league’s lesser teams.However, things have changed in the desert, as under head coach Bruce Arians and general manager Steve Keim the Cardinals won 11 games and reached the postseason last season despite suffering more than their fair share of injuries. 2010: No. 26 overall 1976: No. 22 overall Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires As players continued to fly off of the board — many of them from the defensive side of the ball — people started to wonder what the Cardinals would do. Set to pick 20th, they decided to trade down a few spots while adding a third-round choice. Good call.At 27, Arizona took Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. Some viewed it as a reach, but mainly because the talented defensive back had languished on some bad Wazzu teams. He ended up being a key member of Arizona’s defense as a rookie, playing a lot of dime linebacker for their unique defensive sets. In all, he finished with 81 tackles — 65 solo — two sacks, one fumble recovery and one forced fumble. Oh, and that third round pick the Cards added in the trade? It turned out to be receiver John Brown. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact No doubt the Cardinals would have rather been picking one stop lower, the second-to-last pick is reserved for the team that loses in the Super Bowl. But alas, that’s where the Cards were in 2009 after falling to the Steelers 27-23 in Super Bowl XLIII, using the 31st pick to select Ohio State running back Beanie Wells. Their good season has led to another low draft pick.Barring a trade, the Cardinals will be the 24th team to pick on April 30. Including this year, the Cardinals franchise — including its time in Chicago and St. Louis — will have had its first-round selection fall in that range or lower just seven times.Here’s a look at the previous six: 1975: No 21 overall The 2009 Cardinals finished with a 10-6 record but lost in the divisional round to the eventual Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints. This earned them the 26th pick, which they used on Tennessee defensive tackle Dan Williams. Williams has had a somewhat inconsistent four years in Arizona, battling weight issues and injuries to the tune of 54 games played. However, he seemed to come on strong in 2013, recording 23 total tackles along with his first career sack and interception (which he returned for a touchdown). He stepped up even more in 2014, tallying 32 total tackles and another sack, parlaying his effort into a four-year, $25 million contract, with roughly $15 million being guaranteed.2014: No. 27 overallcenter_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo The 1975 Cardinals reached the postseason for the second straight year with an 11-3 record along with another NFC East title, but saw their season come to an end by way of a 35-23 loss to the L.A. Rams in the divisional round. That left them with the 22nd pick in the draft, and they spent it on defensive tackle Mike Dawson out of Arizona. Dawson lasted nine NFL seasons — seven of which were spent in St. Louis. He appeared in 88 games with the Cardinals, including 84 starts. He tallied 3.5 sacks in 1982, which was the first year the NFL kept track of the statistic. And after a rookie season that saw Wells rush for 793 yards and seven touchdowns, it appeared like the Cardinals may have found something. But injuries slowed his progression and while Wells ran for 1,047 yards and 10 touchdowns in 2011, he failed to establish himself as an every-down NFL back. Wells rushed for just 234 yards and five touchdowns in eight games in 2012, and was waived the following offseason. He has not gotten back on the field since. 0 Comments   Share   The 1998 season saw the Cardinals rally to earn a Wild Card berth, getting them to the postseason for the first time since the franchise moved to Arizona. They even knocked off the Dallas Cowboys 20-7 in the Wild Card round before losing to the Vikings 41-21 in the divisional round. This earned them the 21st pick in the draft, which they used on Eastern Michigan tackle L.J. Shelton.Now to be fair, Shelton was not the first player the Cardinals took in 1999. By way of a trade they made the previous draft with the San Diego Chargers, they also held the eighth pick, which was used to take Ohio State receiver David Boston. But that was San Diego’s pick, not Arizona’s. Shelton was supposed to be Lomas Brown’s replacement, but those plans were delayed when a contract holdout led to him missing the first two games of the regular season. Once with the team, however, Shelton proved to be a pretty solid acquisition. In all, Shelton spent six seasons with the Cardinals, playing in 82 games with 77 starts. Mostly a left tackle, 2004 saw the lineman move to the right side. 2009: No. 31 overall Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The 1974 St. Louis Cardinals won the NFC East with a 10-4 record but lost in the divisional playoff round to the Minnesota Vikings. This left them with the 21st pick in the draft, and they used it to select defensive back Tim Gray out of Texas A&M.Gray lasted just one season with the Cardinals, though, appearing in all 14 games but failing to record an interception. He returned one kick for 20 yards 1999: No. 21 overalllast_img read more

November 2 2009 This report continues from 1

first_imgNovember 2, 2009 This report continues from 10/19/09: The formworks for the heat duct tunnel footings were removed last week. This shows a plan view of the footings for the heat duct tunnel wall sloping down to the pool. [photo: Anna Tran & text: Anna Tran & David Tollas] The next stage is building formworks for the retaining wall down the slope and next to the pool. Here we see the crew working on a retaining wall, shoring dirt under the scab of the pool that will be the east wall of the heat duct tunnel. [photo: Anna Tran & text: Anna Tran & David Tollas] Once the formworks were built, the crew mixed concrete for the heat duct tunnel footing and retaining wall at the pool level. [photo: Anna Tran & text: Anna Tran & David Tollas] The concrete was dumped into wheel barrels and transported to the pool bridge, shoveled into buckets, and passed down to be poured into the formworks. [photo: Anna Tran & text: Anna Tran & David Tollas] Here we see a photo of the two formworks that was taken a few days after the pour. While the concrete cures, the crew will continue building formworks for the heat duct tunnel roof and retaining wall as well as excavating the slope below the pool. We will continue to report on the construction progress next week. [photo & text: Anna Tran]last_img read more

Rep Yaroch Clinton Township EMS chief speak on need for first responder

first_img State Rep. Jeff Yaroch, who served for 26 years as a firefighter and paramedic in Clinton Township, called on the House Law and Justice Committee to consider legislation to improve protection for police, fire and emergency service personnel during testimony today.“I never felt, because we were the good guys, that we’d ever be targeted when responding to an emergency call,” said Yaroch, while sitting next to EMS Chief John Gallagher of the Clinton Township Fire Department. “I don’t know if I’d feel that way now.”Gallagher supported Yaroch by recounting an emergency services call that he and Yaroch responded to that led to a dangerous situation for all responding units and area residents.Yaroch is the primary sponsor for one of the three bills seeking to protect first responders with House Bill 4585, preventing intimidation or targeting of fire department and emergency medical service personnel. Partner legislation by state Reps. Klint Kesto and Brandt Iden would extend similar protection to police and corrections officials, while also setting guidelines to make violations a felony punishable by up to two years imprisonment.The committee heard testimony from four other police and fire officials, including Detroit Police Department Chief James Craig, in support of the legislation.“Unfortunately, there is a lot of frustration with government and first responders, because they have a patch on their arm that says “City of …” said Yaroch, of Richmond. “We’re sending a message that we are in support of these individuals who maintain our safety, stability and security. We need to stand behind them.”HB 4590, sponsored by Kesto, and 4591, sponsored by Iden, also remain under consideration of the committee. Categories: News,Yaroch News,Yaroch Photos 26Sep Rep. Yaroch, Clinton Township EMS chief speak on need for first responder protectionlast_img read more

Erik Huggers Music video service Vevo is plannin

first_imgErik HuggersMusic video service, Vevo, is planning to launch a subscription-based offering to complement its ad-supported business, according to CEO Erik Huggers.Speaking at the Code/Media conference in California the former Intel and BBC executive said: “The move towards subscription, a premium product – that’s something we’re very interested in and very much working towards.”Huggers said Vevo believes in a “dual revenue stream” to build on the company’s progress in 2015 – which he said was the “absolute biggest year in Vevo history”.“Just having an ad-supported model is not sustainable in the long-run. But we do believe that an ad-supported, plus a pay model, makes a tonne of sense,” said Huggers, who would not elaborate on what would be offered on the pay tier.Last year, YouTube launched a standalone YouTube Music app, designed to make it easier to discover music. The service is free, but YouTube said that users can “amplify” their experience by subscribing to its YouTube Red subscription service. This lets YouTube Music users listen to music offline on mobile devices, listen in audio mode without having to load video, and listen to music ‘in the background’ while using other apps.last_img read more

The inspiration arrived in a haze at a Paul McCart

first_imgThe inspiration arrived in a haze at a Paul McCartney concert a few years ago in San Francisco.”People in front of me started lighting up and then other people started lighting up,” says Matthew Springer, a biologist and professor in the division of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco. “And for a few naive split seconds I was thinking to myself, ‘Hey, they can’t smoke in AT&T Park! I’m sure that’s not allowed.’ And then I realized that it was all marijuana.”Recreational pot was not legal yet in the state, but that stopped no one. “Paul McCartney actually stopped between numbers and sniffed the air and said, ‘There’s something in the air — must be San Francisco!’ ” Springer recalls.As the visible cloud of pot smoke took shape, so did Springer’s idea to study the effects of secondhand marijuana smoke.He started thinking: San Franciscans would never tolerate those levels of cigarette smoke in a public place anymore. So why were they OK with smoke from burning pot? Did people just assume that cannabis smoke isn’t harmful the way tobacco smoke is?Springer was already researching the health effects of secondhand tobacco smoke on rats at his lab at UCSF. He decided to run the same tests using joints.”By the time I left the concert, I was resolved to at least try to make this happen,” he says.He knew it would be difficult. Marijuana is still an illegal drug under federal law, and Springer’s research uses federal funds; so he has to purchase specially approved government cannabis for study. He also can’t test it on humans; hence, the rats.In the lab, Springer puts a cigarette or a joint in a plexiglass box. Then he lights it, and lets the chamber fill with smoke, where an anesthetized rat is exposed to the smoke.So far, Springer and his colleagues have published research demonstrating that secondhand smoke makes it harder for the rats’ arteries to expand and allow a healthy flow of blood.With tobacco products, this effect lasts about 30 minutes, and then the arteries recover their normal function. But if it happens over and over — as when a person is smoking cigarette after cigarette, for example — the arterial walls can become permanently damaged, and that damage can cause blood clots, heart attack or stroke.Springer demonstrated that, at least in rats, the same physiological effect occurs after inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana. And, the arteries take 90 minutes to recover compared to the 30 minutes with cigarette smoke.Springer’s discovery about the effect on blood vessels describes just one harmful impact for nonsmokers who are exposed to marijuana. Statewide sampling surveys of cannabis products sold in marijuana dispensaries have shown that cannabis products may contain dangerous bacteria or mold, or residues from pesticides and solvents.California law requires testing for these contaminants, and those regulations are being initiated in three phases over the course of 2018. Because much of the marijuana being sold now was harvested in 2017, consumers will have to wait until early 2019 before they can purchase products that have been fully tested according to state standards.”People think cannabis is fine because it’s ‘natural,’ ” Springer says. “I hear this a lot. I don’t know what it means.” He concedes that tightly regulated marijuana, which has been fully tested, doesn’t have as many chemical additives as cigarettes.But even if the cannabis tests clean, Springer says, smoke itself is bad for the lungs, heart and blood vessels. Other researchers are exploring the possible relationship between marijuana smoke and long-term cancer risk.Certainly, living with a smoker is worse for your health than just going to a smoky concert hall. But, Springer says, the less you inhale any kind of smoke, the better.”People should think of this not as an anti-THC conclusion,” he says, referencing the active ingredient in marijuana, “but an anti-smoke conclusion.”So is the solution simply to avoid smoke from combustion? In other words, is it safer to eat cannabis-infused products, or use “smokeless” e-cigarettes or vaping devices?Springer still urges caution on that score because vaping, for example, can have its own health effects. Vaping devices don’t produce smoke from combustion, but they do release a cloud of aerosolized chemicals. Springer is studying the health effects of those chemicals, too.All this research takes time. Meanwhile, Springer worries that people might come to the wrong conclusion — that the absence of research means the secondhand smoke is OK.”We in the public health community have been telling them for decades to avoid inhaling secondhand smoke from tobacco,” Springer says. “We have not been telling them to avoid inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana, and that’s not because it’s not bad for you — it’s because we just haven’t known. The experiments haven’t been done.”Antismoking campaigners say we can’t afford to wait until the research is complete. Recreational pot is already a reality.Cynthia Hallett is the president of Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights, based in Berkeley, Calif. The organization was established in 1976, before there was a lot known about the health effects of secondhand smoke from tobacco.Now that cannabis is becoming more common across the country — more than 20 cities or states have legalized it in some form — her organization is taking on the issue of secondhand marijuana smoke, too.Hallett says some of the arguments being made in support of cannabis remind her of the arguments made on behalf of tobacco decades ago.”I’m seeing a parallel between this argument that, ‘Gee, we just don’t have a lot of science and so, therefore, let’s wait and see,’ ” Hallett says. “The tobacco companies used to say the same thing about tobacco cigarettes.”In California, smoking cannabis is prohibited anywhere tobacco smoking is prohibited — including schools, airplanes and most workplaces. Hallett is worried that the legalization of pot could be used to erode those rules.It starts with the premise of decriminalization, she says, and then, over time, there’s “a chipping away at strong policies.”Some cannabis advocates want to see pot regulated like alcohol — cities would issue permits for specialized smoking lounges, similar to wine bars.But Hallett points out that smoke drifts, and it affects workers in a way that alcohol doesn’t.”The difference is, if I were to spill my beer on you in a bar, it wouldn’t affect your long-term health,” she says. “If I choose to smoke, it can affect the health of the person near me.”Pot is more like tobacco in that respect, and Hallett believes it should be regulated that way.She says this era of California culture brings to mind a similar period in the 1970s and ’80s, when Americans started demanding more regulations for secondhand smoke, and a new etiquette around smoking took form.When it comes to marijuana, Hallett says, “it is still polite for you to say: ‘Would you mind not smoking around me?’ “At Magnolia, a cannabis dispensary in Oakland, Calif., pot smokers talk about what responsibilities — if any — they should have when it comes to nearby nonsmokers.”This is the first time that I have heard secondhand smoke in reference to cannabis,” admits Lee Crow, a patient-services clerk at Magnolia. “I’ve tried to be courteous — just common courtesy, like with anything.”The dispensary’s director of clinical services, Barbara Blaser, admits she thinks a lot about secondhand smoke from cigarettes, but not pot.”Both of my parents died of lung cancer!” she says. “I will stop a stranger and say, ‘You shouldn’t be smoking. My dad died of that!’ “California’s Proposition 64, approved by state voters in 2016, requires that some of the state tax revenue from the sale of marijuana to be distributed to cannabis researchers. In addition, the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board is examining workplace hazards that are specific to the cannabis industry.This story is part of NPR’s reporting partnership, local member stations and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 KALW. To see more, visit KALW.last_img read more

The government failed to take any account of the i

first_imgThe government failed to take any account of the impact on disabled pupils of its “discriminatory” plans to expand grammar schools in England, say campaigners.A government consultation paper published this week, Schools That Work For Everyone, includes plans to remove the ban on opening new grammar schools in England.But there is not a single mention of disabled pupils in the consultation paper, and the Department for Education (DfE) has failed to carry out an equality impact assessment of its proposals.Inclusive education campaigners say that expanding grammar schools – secondary schools which select pupils via an entrance test – will discriminate against disabled children and lead to more segregated education in special schools.And they say the plans are a clear breach of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, with new UN guidance making it clear that all segregated education should end and be replaced by “inclusive classroom teaching in accessible learning environments with appropriate supports”.There are currently 163 grammar schools in England, educating about five per cent of state secondary pupils, while 10 local authorities have wholly selective education systems and another 26 have one or more grammar schools in their area.Laws currently ban any new selective schools and prevent existing non-selective schools from becoming selective, but prime minister Theresa May – and education secretary Justine Greening – want to expand existing grammar schools, create new selective schools and allow non-selective schools to become selective.They say this will only be allowed if “action to expand existing selective schools or establish new selective schools is accompanied at the same time by support to ensure good quality non-selective places locally”.But The Alliance for Inclusive Education (ALLFIE) said the policy of increasing selective schools, and the consultation paper itself, discriminate against disabled children.It highlighted DfE’s failure to carry out an assessment of the impact of the policy on disabled children and other groups protected under the Equality Act 2010.ALLFIE said the consultation paper was “an onslaught on disabled children and young people’s social mobility, and on their parents’ rights to choose a good mainstream school placement”.Simone Aspis (pictured), ALLFIE’s policy and campaigns coordinator, said the consultation paper was “obviously discriminatory”.She said: “They obviously have not thought about what the implications are for disabled children.“For disabled children and their families, it means less choice and more segregation.“What will happen is more and more disabled children are going to be forced into segregated education provision.”ALLFIE pointed out that disabled children with education, health and care plans (EHCPs) or statements of special educational needs represent only 0.1 per cent of grammar school pupils, despite making up 1.8 per cent of the secondary school population.And disabled children without statements or EHCPs make up only 4.2 per cent of grammar school pupils, but 12.4 per cent of all secondary school pupils.ALLFIE said the government’s existing education policies over the last six years had led to a steady increase in the number of disabled children being educated in special schools.Aspis said: “If mainstream schools become selective, where will disabled children go?“They will have no choice other than to attend a special school against their own and their parents’ wishes, which is scandalous, especially if the prime minister talks about creating one nation.“This government has ratified the United Nations Convention on Persons with Disabilities, including article 24 that makes it clear that disabled children’s access to mainstream education is a human right and that an education system that separates and segregates disabled children is a violation of their right to mainstream education.”When a DfE spokesman was asked by Disability News Service about the failure to mention disabled pupils in the consultation paper, he said: “The top line is schools that work for everyone, that’s the point. When we talk about everyone we [mean] everyone.”He refused to answer a series of questions about the alleged discriminatory nature of the consultation paper, why DfE had failed to carry out an equality impact assessment, and whether the policy would lead to greater segregation of disabled pupils in special schools.Instead, he said the consultation paper “looks at how every child should have access to a good education. As such, that should be understood to include those with special educational needs and disabilities.”He added in a statement: “Every child, regardless of background or ability, should have access to an excellent education.“We know that grammar schools provide a good education for their disadvantaged pupils and we want more pupils from lower income backgrounds to benefit from that.“Our proposals will ensure that any new and existing selective schools will prioritise the admission of disadvantaged pupils and that they support other local pupils in non-selective schools to help drive up educational outcomes.“As set out in the consultation document, we are clear that relaxing restrictions on selective education can and should be to the betterment, not at the expense, of other local schools.”last_img read more

Papa Johns Files Trademark to Lose Its Apostrophe and Spotlights New Papas

first_img Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Image credit: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Grammar is only one tactic the pizza chain is using to distance itself from John Schnatter. Register Now » It’s not Papa John’s pizza, it’s everyone’s pizza. Every franchisee and employee’s pizza. Or it will be, officially, if Papa John’s decides to lose its apostrophe and become Papa Johns.Why drop the possessive? The company has cut ties with founder John Schnatter this year after he made a series of racially divisive comments. Those comments inspired white supremacists to declare Papa John’s “the pizza of the alt-right” and send the company into full-on damage control rebrand mode. One of the measures the company has taken is filing a new logo with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The new logo, which the company has not implemented, does not contain an apostrophe, a seemingly symbolic acknowledgment of Schnatter’s departure. However, the company has not yet implemented a name or logo change, and Schnatter is still it’s largest shareholder, so at least for now, it’s still Papa John’s. The company “has no imminent plans to use the new logo,” a spokesperson told AdAge. Meanwhile, it’s removed Schnatter’s image from its pizza boxes.Wait, what’d he do again?On an earnings call in November 2017, Schnatter criticized the NFL for its handling of the #TakeAKnee protests. By New Year’s, he’d stepped down as CEO. Then this summer, it came to light that he’d used the “n-word” on a company conference call which Papa John’s held for the express purpose of executive media training. He lost his board chair position on July 11 as a result. Schnatter has also been accused of sexual misconduct, and he’s filed at least two lawsuits against Papa John’s, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.Related: Papa John’s Has Created a Social Media Ad Featuring Negative Customer Tweets That’s Been Watched 1.7 Million TimesIn the wake of his resignations from company leadership, he’s publicly declared his commitment to Papa John’s employees and launched SavePapaJohns.com in an attempt to clarify “the truth” about what happened between him and the company. He’s also made several critical comments regarding the executives that have succeeded him.Papa John’s has launched a couple of bold marketing campaigns over the past month. In one, the company displayed screenshots of numerous tweets from disappointed customers who thought the company sympathized with racists and white supremacists, given Schnatter’s remarks. It denounced this reputation and assured customers it was listening to their concerns. Internally, the pizza chain has spearheaded diversity training campaigns and other initiatives. It’s also published a new values statement. Last week, Papa John’s rolled out a new ad campaign featuring franchisees and employees rather than Schnatter. On Twitter, the company has been changing its account photo, bio and name daily. Yesterday it was Papa Brant Barnes. Today it’s Papa Kiersten Bates. Wait, who? Exactly. The company wants to tell the stories of other people behind the brand. Under Kiersten Bates’s photo and name, the Twitter bio reads, “‘I’m a Papa John’s GM in MI. I love spending time w/my son & my favorite topping is bacon. I am one of 120,000 voices of Papa John’s.’ -Kiersten Bates” “You’ve heard one voice of Papa John’s for a long time,” a franchisee in a video says. “It’s time you heard from all of us,” a marketing manager follows.In our communities. On the phone. Behind the counter. At your door. These are the real voices of Papa John’s. pic.twitter.com/Lz1Lga8uSP— Papa Kiersten Bates (@PapaJohns) September 18, 2018To that end, Papa John’s also has launched Stories.PapaJohns.com, where it spotlights various franchisees and employees. The site also addresses the controversy that has surrounded the company over the past several months.But back to the apostrophe.Will they change it? Time will tell. IHOP didn’t actually change its name to IHOB. It was just a temporary marketing campaign to make people think of the restaurant chain for burgers in addition to pancakes.Related: Ousted Papa John’s Founder Creates Website to ‘Save’ His Company and Get the ‘Truth Out There’Besides, the Papa John’s apostrophe is kind of like peperoncino in the corner of every one of its pizza boxes. It’s a small thing, but you’d notice if Papa John’s got rid of it. Plus, Papa Johns implies a bunch of people named John. But they’re not all named John, as the chain has shown us. (Brant? Kiersten? Bueller?) Speaking of johns, this kind of reminds me of that Saturday Night Live sketch, “Jon Hamm’s John Ham.”I also will note that this is a tremendous opportunity for a collaboration between indie folk-rock meta master Father John Misty on a campaign. But he’s not much of a marketing campaign collaborator kinda guy.I also will note that the logo in the upper left corner of Schnatter’s rebuttal website, SavePapaJohns.com, lacks an apostrophe. So maybe it’s not that crucial, if the man himself isn’t taking every opportunity to declare ownership.Further, all of this begs the question, wouldn’t the singular be Papa John and the plural be Papas John? (Hat tip to Entrepreneur Insights Editor Liz Webber for that one.) Add to Queue Lydia Belanger –sharescenter_img Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Next Article Papa John’s Files Trademark to Lose Its Apostrophe and Spotlights New ‘Papas’ Who Aren’t Its Founder September 25, 2018 Rebranding 5 min readlast_img read more

Buffett says Berkshire Hathaway is sound even without him

At an annual shareholders’ meeting in his home town of Omaha, Nebraska, Buffett was peppered with questions about the future of the company without Buffett, who is a quasi deity among the investing public.He said Berkshire Hathaway’s success was not due to his celebrity status but rather to good business sense when it comes to sniffing out business opportunities and making sound investments.”The reputation belongs to Berkshire. Now, for somebody that cares about a business we absolutely are the first call and will continue to be the first call,” he said.Investors in America tend to turn to Buffett and see what he is doing with his billions during bad times, such as during the big financial crisis of the previous decade.If Buffett invests in a company, many people take it as a sign that you can trust the future of that firm.On Friday, for instance, shares in Apple rose four percent on news that he was increasing his stake in the company.Some in America are wondering if Berkshire Hathaway will remain such a bellwether once Buffett is gone.”If they care about where the business ends up being one way or another, we absolutely are the first call,” he said Saturday. “I don’t think they will hang up if I don’t answer, if they need the money.” Berkshire Hathaway has stakes in a wide variety of companies such as Coca-Cola, American Express, Wells Fargo and Delta Air Lines.In the first quarter of the year, it posted a rare loss—of $1.14 billion—according to a statement issued Saturday. That compares to a profit of $4.07 billion in the same quarter of last year.The company said the loss was due to billions in charges on estimated potential losses it must book because of new accounting rules. Investor guru Warren Buffett, 87, told shareholders Saturday that his holding company Berkshire Hathaway will continue to prosper after he is gone. Buffett’s firm buys 75 million more Apple shares in 1Q Citation: Buffett says Berkshire Hathaway is sound even without him (2018, May 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-buffett-berkshire-hathaway.html Investor Warren Buffett speaks on June 14 of last year in Washington © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further read more

Are we on the right road to driverless cars

first_img Citation: Are we on the right road to driverless cars? (2019, April 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-road-driverless-cars.html More information: Alexandros Nikitas et al. Examining the myths of connected and autonomous vehicles: analysing the pathway to a driverless mobility paradigm, International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management (2019). DOI: 10.1504/IJATM.2019.098513 Driverless cars are forcing cities to become smart Provided by Inderscience Alexandros Nikitas, Eric Tchouamou Njoya, and Samir Dani suggest that “Connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) could become the most powerful mobility intervention.” Unfortunately, despite the paradigm-shifting impact on traffic safety, economics, the environment, social inclusion, and network performance, there are still many complications associated with acceptance by the industry, policymakers, drivers, and passengers to be addressed before this new transport becomes the norm.The team recognizes that there is a pressing need to frame an unproven, disruptive, and life-changing intervention, against the conventional automobile technologies without generating new misconceptions, overreaching expectations, and with sufficient room to accommodate predictive errors and avoiding hyperbole. If the benefits of this paradigm shift are to be wrought. They discuss 11 myths surrounding connected and autonomous vehiclesEnhanced traffic safety and accident preventionBetter security – more monitoring and control of the vehicles of the new travel eco-systemReduced traffic congestion due to more efficient mobility and parking management.Significant time savings – people can use in-vehicle time to be more productive.Smoother rides, more cabin space and more relaxed travelingEnvironmental benefits including less CO2 emissions due to CAVs eco-driving capacityDecreased noise nuisance – CAVs will have more noiseless engines and drive unobtrusivelyReduced energy consumption and fossil fuel dependence due to CAVs eco-driving capacityHuge car-sharing and demand-responsive public transport potential.Fewer layers of social exclusion – less age, disability and skill barriers in ‘driving’ a vehicleSmaller enforcing, policing, insurance premiums and road signage requirementsTheir paper tests these 11 myths that perhaps refer to an overly optimistic CAV development and adoption timeline. By taking this approach they have highlighted unresolved issues that need to be addressed before an inescapable transition can happen. They thus provide relevant policy recommendations on how it might ultimately become achievable. Explore further There is much ongoing research into autonomous road vehicles and experimental cars and heavy-goods vehicles have already hit the roads. A paper published in the International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management examines some of the myths associated with driverless vehicles and analyses the route that we might navigate to a new transport destination – the autonomous mobility paradigm. Credit: CC0 Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

TACC Ranch technology upgrade improves valuable data storage

first_img Users of advanced computing can likely relate to this. The exponential growth of data poses a steep challenge to efforts for its reliable storage. For over 12 years, the Ranch system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) has provided long-term archiving of research data ranging from astrophysics to climate science to particle physics, and more. A new upgrade to hardware and software brings good news to over 52,000 users of TACC’s Ranch long-term mass data storage system.The archives are valuable to scientists who want to use the data to help reproduce the measurements and results of prior research. Computational reproducibility is one piece of the larger concept of scientific reproducibility, which forms a cornerstone of the scientific method.TACC strives to comprehensively support the data needs of scientists. The local compute systems such as Stampede2 and Lonestar provide a high-speed scratch space dedicated for temporary storage of data. Next up the ladder are the front-facing data collection systems of Stockyard and Corral, which provide a combined storage of 50 petabytes directly accessible through high speed web connections or the iRODS data grid. Ranch, on the other hand, allows long-term archiving of data for months to years. Provided by University of Texas at Austin There’s a joke by comedian Steven Wright that goes, “You can’t have everything. Where would you put it?” Another welcome change to Ranch comes from the company Quantum, which provided a Scalar i6000 tape library with the Quantum StorNext archival file system that coordinates both disk and tape storage. “We chose the Quantum system based on its capability and flexibility,” said Junseong Heo, senior systems administrator and manager, Large Scale Systems of TACC’s Advanced Computing Systems group. As of April 2019, Ranch stores over 70 petabytes, or 70 million gigabytes of scientific data. Over 52,000 users have uploaded close to 1.7 billion computer files on the old library of Ranch that’s being upgraded. Hypothetically, the new upgrades to Ranch could expand its storage to reach a mind-boggling exabyte, or 1,000 petabytes.”For users, more data will be more readily available, with 15 times more disk cache than what we had on the previous Ranch system,” said Tommy Minyard, director of Advanced Computing Systems at TACC. Fresh data that’s generated from TACC supercomputers such as Stampede2, Lonestar, or Maverick is staged first on Ranch’s spinning disk and flash drives, then later moved to tapes.Ranch has been upgraded with a block storage system supplied by DataDirect Networks, the DDN SFA14K DCR, which provides 30 petabytes of spinning disk cache, versus just two on the replaced hardware. “That means that we’ll be able to keep a lot more data staged on disks so that it’s more quickly retrievable and you don’t have to recall it from tape,” Minyard added. “Specifically, Quantum provides a quota control mechanism that enables TACC to provide an allocation-based project area for users,” Heo added. That means that users can have much easier access to data and oversee the usage of resources. “The project-based quota has been at the top of the wish list from users in the past,” Heo said.”TACC’s focus on constant innovation creates an environment that places tremendous stress on storage, and Quantum has long been at the forefront in managing solutions that meet the most extreme reliability, accessibility and massive scalability requirements,” said “Eric Bassier, Senior Director of Product Marketing, Quantum. “Combining Scalar tape with StorNext data management capabilities creates an HSM (Hierarchical storage management) solution that is capable of delivering under the demanding conditions of the TACC environment.””The new system provides some additional capabilities for us to be able to handle project data and tiers of storage better than the old system did,” Minyard added. This is especially good news for heavy Ranch users, whose allocation might change frequently. The heaviest 100 users combined have more than 20 petabytes on the current archive system.One of the big changes users will notice is the adoption of the Community Enterprise Operating System (CentOS) environment, which replaced the previous Solaris environment. As users navigate CentOS to migrate their files to the new Ranch libraries, TACC is providing 12 months of read-only access to data in the old library until the end of March 31, 2020. Users should inspect and migrate data in favorable sizes for the tape archives, preferably bigger than 100 gigabytes in individual file size.”Archival data isn’t glamorous, but it’s required,” said Minyard. “I don’t know how many times we’ve had somebody panic about accidentally deleting a file, where TACC was able to recall the file for them from Ranch. From their point of view, Ranch is a life-saver,” Minyard said. Citation: TACC Ranch technology upgrade improves valuable data storage (2019, May 22) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-tacc-ranch-technology-valuable-storage.html Ranch upgraded to the DDN SFA14K DCR block storage system, supplied by DataDirect Networks, which provides 30 petabytes of spinning disk cache. Credit: TACC Large Hadron Collider pushing computing to the limits TACC’s Ranch archival system includes a Quantum Scalar i6000 tape library with the StorNext archival file system that coordinates both disk and tape storage. Inside view (left) and outside (right). Credit: TACC New upgrade to hardware and software brings good news to over 52,000 users of TACC’s Ranch long-term mass storage system. Credit: TACC Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. 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Juno Finds Mysterious Unexpected Currents Crackling Through Jupiters Magnetosphere

first_img 5 Mars Myths and Misconceptions Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoFinance DailySeniors With No Life Insurance May Get Up To $250,000 If They Do This…Finance DailyUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Mercedes-Benz Smart Models Worth ConsideringKelley Blue BookUndoFinance101What Are The Best States To Retire In?Finance101UndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndo Science Fact or Fantasy? 20 Imaginary Worlds The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics There are turbulent, unexpected currents crackling through Jupiter’s atmosphere, producing brilliant auroras. Juno, the NASA probe that has orbited the gas giant since 2016, passes over Jupiter’s polar regions ever 53.5 days, collecting data on the magnetic forces that produce ultrabright auroras above the huge planet. In a new paper, published July 8 in the journal Nature Astronomy, researchers working with Juno’s data discovered that the electric currents passing through Jupiter’s magnetosphere — the region of its atmosphere richest with magnetic field lines — don’t act as expected. The probe found less direct current — current that constantly flows in one direction — than physicists predicted. It was only about 50 million amperes, an incredibly powerful current, but not as high as theoretical models of Jupiter’s magnetosphere suggested would be present. That finding suggests that “alternating current” — current that flickers back and forth — plays a much bigger role in producing Jupiter’s auroras than anyone realized, the researchers wrote. On Jupiter, as on Earth, auroras are a product of whirling currents in magnetic fields interacting with high-energy particles from the sun. [10 Places in the Solar System We’d Most Like to Visit]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65951-jupiter-currents-magnetosphere-tesla.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “These observations, combined with other Juno spacecraft measurements, show that alternating currents play a much greater role in generating Jupiter’s aurora than the direct current system,” Joachim Saur, an author of the paper, said in a statement. On Earth, we typically think of alternating and direct currents (AC and DC) in terms of electronics. Famously, in the late 19th century, inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla disagreed sharply over which method should be used to deliver power to electrical devices. DC power doesn’t convert as easily between different voltages, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), so Tesla wanted to turn the more-easily convertible AC into the standard. Edison, guarding his DC-dependant patents, resisted the change and spread misinformation that AC was more dangerous, according to the DOE. Tesla won out in the end, and AC became the standard for U.S. power plants. However, according to the DOE, direct current has regained favor as more battery-powered devices have come to market. Your lights are probably running on AC power, but there’s a good chance the device you’re reading this on relies on DC. (That’s why your laptop requires an AC adapter.) In the space around Jupiter, the proportion of AC to DC isn’t determined by feuding pre-modern inventors, but by the behavior of ions in the planet’s atmosphere. Jupiter has powerful currents than Earth for several reasons, including its huge size, its fast rate of spin and the excess of charged particles (ions) pumped out from volcanoes on the moon Io. That such a large proportion of those currents are AC seems to be a result of turbulence in the planet’s magnetic fields, the researchers wrote. Turbulence in this sense refers to the disordered way in which the magnetic fields’ shape and directionality fluctuates. And that turbulence is producing different effects at each of Jupiter’s two poles. In the time Juno has orbited Jupiter, the planet’s north pole has experienced about half the current of the south pole, the researchers wrote. That seems to be a result of the much more complex arrangement of magnetic field lines in the north, which interrupts the flow of currents. In the south, they wrote, the magnetic field lines are “smoother.” The effects of those differences are visible in the two poles’ auroras, they noted. In the north, the auroras tend to be more widely dispersed, with a structure of “filaments and flares.” In the south, the auroras tend to be more structured, with a “bright arc” extending out from the main oval where auroras occur. This research on Jupiter’s powerful magnetic fields, the researchers wrote, could inform their understanding of Earth’s weaker magnetic field — humanity’s main protection against harsh solar particles. Some researchers already suspected turbulence produced a significant proportion of currents around our planet. This work seems to lend credence to that idea.last_img read more