ScienceShot: More Olives in a Warming World

first_imgOlive growers might be some of the few farmers to see increased yields and profits in a warmer world, a new study suggests. Using a regional climate model, researchers looked at how a rise in global average temperature of 1.8°C (the temperature change expected between the 1960s and the 2040s) might affect the growth of olive trees (Olea europaea) and the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), one of the crop’s major pests. In the Mediterranean Basin, where 97% of the world’s olive crop is grown (much of it to produce olive oil), expected climate change will cause yields across the region to grow by 4.1% and net profits to grow by 9.6%, the researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. While the region’s olive crop will improve overall, some areas will see profits (expressed in euros per hectare on this map) drop substantially, the researchers estimate. In North Africa, where yields are now low, estimated profits will rise more than 41%, but in the Middle East, along the eastern portions of the Mediterranean, profits will decline an average of 7.2%. How increased warmth affects the olive fruit fly will have the biggest effect on profits, the team notes: Because the olive tree withstands heat better than its major pest does, some areas now infested with the olive fruit fly will become unsuitable for the insect in coming years.See more ScienceShots.(Linked map credit: Luigi Ponti)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Wilks said Wednesday at the combine that he liked

first_imgWilks said Wednesday at the combine that he liked Mathieu’s skillset and would mesh well with how the coach’s former team, the Carolina Panthers, played as a heavy-blitzing squad.“When you look at the skillset that he has, I think he can do so much,” Wilks told reporters in Indianapolis. Top Stories Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires The Arizona Cardinals continue evaluating how their returning players fit in the system employed by first-year head coach Steve Wilks, and that includes determining how 25-year-old defensive back Tyrann Mathieu figures into the team’s future.Cardinals general manager Steve Keim said Wednesday at the NFL Scouting Combine that he was evaluating the future of all players when he was asked by a reporter if the team was operating as if Mathieu will be on the roster upon the new league year on March 14. 23 Comments   Share   Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and sellingcenter_img “It’s what we’re doing right now with our coaching staff is looking not only at Tyrann but every player, and see how they fit,” Keim said. “So how do they fit (with) what we’re asking them to do schematically, but where they fit from a salary standpoint — all those things moving forward.“And there’s a lot of moving parts: What we’re potentially going to do in free agency, how that affects our cap situation. And I feel like we have a pretty good grasp on that.”Related LinksNFL.com’s Rosenthal: Cardinals’ Mathieu a trade candidate to watchMathieu seems quite aware that while he’s under contract, the team could potentially move in a different direction. It’s a business 😎 https://t.co/1l5OPGuGOq— Tyrann Mathieu (@Mathieu_Era) February 28, 2018Mathieu signed a five-year contract extension in 2016, but the Cardinals can use the next few weeks to evaluate whether his projected production is worth the price tag.The defensive back will be paid $5.75 million in base salary for 2018 but has $8 million of his 2019 salary guaranteed if he’s on the Cardinals by March 14. He also has a $5 million roster bonus owed on March 16, per Spotrac.com.Mathieu is the fourth-highest cap hit ($14.1 million) on the Cardinals’ roster for 2018, according to Spotrac.com. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelolast_img read more