What Owners Want From Home Insurance

first_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Agents Flood Insurance Home Homeowners Insurance Value Insured About Author: Radhika Ojha What Owners Want From Home Insurance October 15, 2018 1,298 Views Home / Daily Dose / What Owners Want From Home Insurance Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Sign up for DS News Daily Agents Flood Insurance Home Homeowners Insurance Value Insured 2018-10-15 Radhika Ojha Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img in Daily Dose, Featured Previous: FHFA Weighs in on Foreclosure Prevention Next: Vacant Property Taxation Put to the Vote The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Homeowners tend to view the agents who look after their property’s insurance, as those who generally give them the right advice and would not hurt their real-estate investment, according to a recent survey by ValueInsured.However, the survey, which asked homeowners to share their opinion of their homeowners’ insurance agent found that four out of ten respondents expressed unflattering or indifferent attitudes towards those who advised them on how to protect their home.While 27 percent of those surveyed said that their agents had the homeowner’s best interest in mind, 22 percent described their agent as a one-time transactional “middleman,” the survey revealed.The survey also indicated that while 25 percent respondents considered their home insurance agent as a trusted adviser, 20 percent described them as a paper pusher who they never heard from except during policy renewal time. Five percent of the respondents admitted that they had no opinion or familiarity with their homeowners’ insurance agent.”The findings highlight the perception of passiveness of some agents, which may have contributed to the image of paper pushers and transactional middlemen associated with some agents,” ValueInsured said.ValueInsured also asked the respondents if their insurance agent demonstrated any other positive traits. Only 21 percent reported them to be innovative and 14 percent said they were resourceful, the survey found.The survey said that homeowners wished their agent could be more proactive, consultative, and could do more to protect them and their properties. “Currently, the relationship is not an engaging or high-touch one, which could lead to high turnover rate,” it revealed.With the recent natural disasters, homeowners insurance has taken center stage, giving agents a window to proactively reach out to homeowners. According to a recent report from Urban Institute, with the number of flood insurance policies in force through the National Flood Insurance Program decreasing in the past 10 years, many homeowners are left without flood insurance, sitting at just over 5 million in 2018. Even with private policies playing an increased role in the future, the current system leaves too many homeowners vulnerable when disaster strikes, the research found.Read more about the reach of flood insurance:Analyzing the Reach of Flood Insurance Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Milan ’54 Hoosiers Museum Receives Grant

first_imgThe Milan ’54 Museum is located at 201 West Carr Street.MILAN – A museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of the 1954 Milan Indian basketball team received a grant from the Ripley County Community Foundation.The funding of $500 will be used for a new annual newsletter later this year to the museum’s members and supporters.“This new program will improve communications with our supporters and add operational strength to the museum,” said Marianne Wiggers President of Milan 54, Inc.“We feel truly blessed that the Ripley County Community Foundation has been such a strong supporter of the Milan ‘54 Hoosiers Museum.”last_img read more

Joburg’s king of muti museum

first_img8 April 2004The Museum of Man and Science is overflowing with illuminating exhibits and interactive displays – of a different kind. It’s actually a shop, and provides an explosion of strange sights and smells.The 66-year-old museum (why it was originally called a museum is lost in time) is a traditional muti or medicine shop in Diagonal Street in Johannesburg’s CBD, and is described on the board above the door as the “The King of Muti, Herbal and Homeopathic Remedies”.It offers “a face of Africa that has largely disappeared in the push of western civilization and the march of ‘progress’ across the traditional life and cultures of the continent”.Walking into the darkish interior, you’ll probably bump your head on the ceiling displays: hundreds of bits of dried skins, horns still attached to skins, bits of bones, ox hooves and tails, ostrich heads and feet, strings of beads, seed anklets, and straw hats. Very interactive.Third-generation owner Peter Naidoo says there’s a cultural reason for having the displays so low. “When people come in they have to bend. This is a sign of respect in African culture.”Naidoo says his shop “caters for all tribes who live in Gauteng and in Africa”.Your nose will start twitching with a smell that is hard to define. Although not unpleasant, it’s pungent and earthy and dry, a mix of dried herbs and mild cow dung. Don’t worry, it’s nothing to do with the animal products – all have been dipped in formalin, a preservation medium.Once you’ve had your fill of the ceiling display, you’ll become aware of a pillar piled with horns and several dried carcasses of monkeys, another one with black and white tyre sandals. Then you’ll notice the counters. One is filled with painted clay pots (used by traditional healers for storing their mixtures) interspersed with metal candelabras.The front of the counter is decorated with walking sticks and metal “church sticks” (used by priests of Zion veld churches); drums decorate the front of another.Walk further in and you’ll find spears, knobkerries and shields and, down one side, pigeon-holes jam-packed with dried roots, bits of bark, branches, dried plants and herbs.The main counter has more walking sticks and knobkerries decorating its front, and rows of intriguing bottles of mixtures behind the counter, on the wall.Over 1 900 herbsNaidoo says there are over 1 900 different herbs in the shop, collected from as far afield as central Africa.The shop’s biggest local selling item is its dried herbs. The walking sticks and drums and other similar items are for sale to tourists, who visit the shop in busloads.The shop has a constant flow of customers, buying items on the instructions of an inyanga – a traditional healer who uses herbal remedies. They’ll visit the inyanga with a complaint, and he or she will advise what herbs are needed. Once the customer has purchased the mix, wrapped in a sheet of newspaper in the shop, he’ll go back to the inyanga who will prepare the remedy and give it to the customer to take.According to Naidoo, traditional African belief says that all things – animal, vegetable or mineral – have power, and small pieces of the animal or vegetable will be used in muti or potions to “ward off evil, for personal protection and luck, or to ensure the faithfulness of a lover or the defeat of an enemy”.“There are in this shop the ingredients to create a muti for almost every malady,” says Naidoo.“The various barks, roots, twigs, and bulbs, as well as the animal parts, are used, either by themselves or mixed together, to create a paste, liquid or powder which will be effective against illnesses, from mild fevers to serious diseases.”Sometimes the patient will only drink the froth on the top of a brew. For other remedies the patient will crouch over a boiling brew, with a blanket over his head, and breath in the steam.Consulting the sangomaThe sangoma, or diviner, is more concerned with the ancestors and keeping them happy. Some illnesses are believed to be caused by unhappy ancestors, who haven’t been respected or acknowledged sufficiently. The sangoma will throw a set of bones, and give advice to the customer on actions to be taken to appease the ancestors.Some items in the shop are exclusively for use by inyangas and sangomas. Calabashes are used by them to store muti, jackal fur caps are worn by them, as are belts decorated with cowrie shells. The tails of cattle, buffalo and wildebeest are a symbol of power and used as whisks to flick muti onto people, or around a hut or village to ward off disease or evil.At the back of the shop is a hut, stacked with muti, with bones and mats on the floor. Customers and tourists can make an appointment with a sangoma, who will throw the bones in the hut and offer advice.Conserving ancient knowledgeNaidoo maintains that 60 percent of all medicines are based on herbs. “It would surprise most people to learn how, of the pharmaceutical products on the shelves of the world today, most have come from information handed down through the traditional healer.”He says that a lot of this knowledge is being lost, as people become more urbanised and move away from their traditional roots.“It is a function of the Museum of Man and Science to recover such valuable information, and to study the effects of the various influences now being superimposed upon the traditional societies of southern Africa,” he says.Naidoo, a Tamil Hindu, also worships the dead. He has a quiet corner of the shop where an incense candle is burning. He says he offers prayers to his late father, Kasavaloo Naidoo.The shop was established in 1938 by the owner’s grandfather, Moonsamy Naidoo. His son, a medical doctor and homeopath, took over the business. According to Kasavaloo Naidoo’s wife, Moonsamy Naidoo used to work with Raymond Dart, who discovered the skull of the Taung child in 1924 near a town called Taung in the far north of the North West Province.Wander around the shop, marvel at the items on display, enjoy the new smells, but be sure of your purchase, because as you hand over your money you’ll notice a sign at the counter which reads: “No Cash Refunds”.Source: City of Johannesburg websitelast_img read more

Michigan beats Purdue to win 2nd straight Big Ten Tournament

first_img“I was so happy when he popped off after that dunk,” Wagner said. “I got so excited. He got emotional. Yeah, I know how good he is. That was long overdue.”The dunk made it 66-48 and brought chants of “Tes-key!” from the Michigan fans — who showed up in droves for the first Big Ten Tournament played in New York.“That was a blast, especially being here in New York City with all those Michigan fans that traveled from great distances or whoever lived here,” Teske said.Purdue (28-6) chipped away in the final minutes with Michigan missing free throws but it was way too late.Haas led Purdue with 23 points, but Purdue’s top-two scorers, Carsen Edwards and Vincent Edwards, combined for 16 points on 6-of-22 shooting. Carsen Edwards scored 53 points in the first two games here, but just 12 against Michigan, shooting 4 for 16.ADVERTISEMENT Michigan players celebrate after beating Purdue 75-66 to win the NCAA Big Ten Conference tournament championship college basketball game, Sunday, March 4, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)NEW YORK — The tenacious point guard his coach calls a “pit bull” drove to the basket, but instead of putting up his go-to hook shot Zavier Simpson whipped a pass to the backup big man who became a Michigan folk hero at Madison Square Garden on Sunday.Jon Teske’s two-handed slam brought down the house and pretty much finished off No. 8 Purdue in the Big Ten Tournament championship game. With Simpson playing catalyst on both ends of the floor — running Michigan’s efficient offense and leading its lock-down defense — and Teske scoring a surprising 14 points, the 15th-ranked Wolverines beat the Boilermakers 75-66.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next Purdue: The Boilermakers beat Michigan in the regular season twice by a total of five points. Unable to complete a three-game sweep, they probably watched any chance of grabbing a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament go away.“A national championship is going to feel a whole lot better than winning the Big Ten,” Haas said.UP NEXTBoth teams will wait a week to find out where they are headed for the NCAA Tournament, along with Michigan State and Ohio State out of the Big Ten. Penn State and Nebraska will cross fingers and hope for a bid. LATEST STORIES Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Mickelson ends longest drought with playoff win in Mexico Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving “He had a couple of drives that didn’t go down for him, and he had a couple of 3s where he could never get back-to-back pullups or back-to-back pull-up 3s to get into that rhythm,” Purdue coach Matt Painter said.This Michigan team has been coach John Beilein’s best on the defensive side since he took over in Ann Arbor in 2007. It starts with the sophomore Simpson harassing opponents’ best ball-handlers.The Wolverines seemed content to let Haas have room inside as long as they were able limit Purdue’s 3s. Purdue entered the game shooting 42 percent from 3. The Boilermakers finished 4 for 17 from behind the arc.On consecutive possessions early in the second half, the Wolverines forced turnovers by Purdue and turned them in transition 3s — one by Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman and one by Simpson. That put Michigan up 11 with 15:06 left, prompted Painter to call a timeout and had Wolverines fans screaming “Go Blue!”“He’s a pit bull,” Beilein said of Simpson. “We have a picture of a big, mean pit bull in our locker room for every game. And he’s that guy. He’s the one that loves to play defense.”Michigan, playing its fourth game, showed no signs of wear. The Wolverines shot 50 percent and committed five turnovers.Last season’s unlikely run to the tournament championship by Michigan was as an eighth seed and it started with a harrowing plane accident near Ann Arbor, Michigan. No one was hurt, but everyone was shaken. Still, the team got to Washington and ripped off four straight wins to grab an NCAA bid.This one was less dramatic — though surely the Wolverines did not mind.BIG PICTUREMichigan: The Wolverines will enter the NCAA Tournament on a nine-game winning streak. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico MOST READ Typhoon ‘Tisoy’ threatens Games View comments Fifth-seeded Michigan (28-7) became the first team to repeat as Big Ten Tournament champs since Ohio State in 2010 and ’11.Simpson finished with 10 points, five assists and five rebounds. Moe Wagner led Michigan with 17 points and was named most outstanding player of the tournament, despite playing only 17 minutes against Purdue because of foul trouble — which plagued him all week.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThat’s where Teske stepped in. The 7-foot-1 sophomore came in averaging 3.3 points, but scored 12 in the first half and picked up the slack guarding Purdue’s 7-2 center Isaac Haas.Simpson and Teske put an exclamation point on Michigan’s four-day Garden party with 6:02 left in the second half. Simpson drove and dished to Teske cutting to the basket. “Big Bad Jon,” as the guys call him, finished over Haas and let out a roar while chest bumping teammates on his way to the bench.last_img read more

College Spun Media Is Looking To Hire A Full-Time Staff Writer

first_imgCS Square LogoCS Square LogoCSsquarelogo-e1344353072209We are expanding!College Spun, founded in September of 2012, is an independent sports blog that brings you the most interesting college athletics stories of the day. The publication, which reaches over three million unique readers per month, focuses on the social media aspect of the industry.We’re looking for one full-time writer to add to our staff for our Hoboken, New Jersey (next to NYC) office. We’re looking for candidates who are obsessed with both entrepreneurship and college sports. Ideal candidates will also have relevant experience in digital media. As an employee of College Spun, you will help dictate the site’s editorial direction.Qualifications:You must be entrepreneurially-minded and OBSESSED with college sports.You must have experience at an online publication.You must be a great writer who can spot an interesting story and have the personality to tell it in an entertaining way.You must be well-versed in social media (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc).You must be able to edit and manage other writers; team players only.You must not care about a 9-5, Monday-Friday lifestyle. Games are all on nights and weekends.You must be competitive by nature and self-motivated.You must be willing to relocate to the NYC area.Think you’re the perfect candidate? Then we can’t wait to meet you. If that’s not you but you know someone else who is that person, please introduce us.To apply, please email [email protected] with your resume and two writing samples.last_img read more

Peace River Regional District releases Chief Administration Officer

first_imgUPDATE: We have reached out to Peace River Regional District Board Chair Brad Sperling for comment on Cvik’s release, but our phone calls have not yet been returned.DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District Board has released Chief Administration Officer Chris Cvik.In a one-line statement posted on their website on Friday, the PRRD said they released their CAO without caused on May 18, 2018. Cvik was hired by the District in 2014 to replace Fred Banham who retired that same year.In a press release in 2014, the District said Cvik brought 20 plus years of progressive experience in both the private sector and senior levels of Local Government.last_img read more