New anti-air missiles on Type 23 frigates put on display

first_img View post tag: Type 23 Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today New anti-air missiles on Type 23 frigates put on display for sailors Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates were given a major anti-air capability upgrade with the Sea Ceptor missile which was recently put on display to soldiers in charge of shooting down enemy aircraft.The HMS Westminster is in the closing stages of a major overhaul in Portsmouth Naval Base which has seen her become one of the first ships in the Fleet to receive Sea Ceptor, the new short-range shield against air attack.The weapon and its supporting radar system will gradually replace the ageing Seawolf missiles fitted across the Type 23 frigate flotilla.In its place, the vertically-launched supersonic Sea Ceptor which is slightly heavier than its predecessor and has a much greater range: more than 25km (15 miles), two and a half times the distance of Seawolf.Westminster is the first ship to receive the Navy’s new shield against air attack system which is also being installed on sister ships Argyll and Montrose during their revamps in Devonport.Rapier is on the verge of retirement, in favour of a ground-based version of Sea Ceptor (short for interceptor).The large trackers which guided the old system have been removed and replaced with its successor’s smaller, more powerful sensors.And the silo has been adapted to accommodate the new supersonic missiles, heavier, over one meter longer and with a range of more than 25km (15 miles), more than twice that of Seawolf.In addition, engineers have installed the Artisan radar which is rapidly becoming prevalent on the Type 23s – it can track more than 800 objects simultaneously as close as 200 meters and as far away as 200,000 (200km, 125 miles, or from Portsmouth to Calais as the crow flies).The gunners of 16 Regiment Royal Artillery, based at Thorney Island – just along the coast from Portsmouth – currently use the veteran Rapier missile to provide their infantry and armoured comrades with cover on the battlefield.Officers and senior non-commissioned officers from 16 Regiment, led by Lieutenant Colonel James Mardlin, made the short trip to Portsmouth to hear both from the ship’s company and from the new missile’s developers MBDA about progress with the system to date and what the future might hold in store for Ceptor.“We are excited about being able to work together over the next few years,” said Lieutenant Commander Chris L’Amie, Westminster’s Senior Naval Officer.“The introduction of Ceptor is a real opportunity for both us and 16 Regiment to learn from each other. We will continue to foster a strong working relationship with our closest military neighbours.”His ship will return to the Fleet next year with a new look and as the Royal Navy’s premier submarine hunter. View post tag: Sea Ceptor New anti-air missiles on Type 23 frigates put on display for sailors Authorities View post tag: Royal Navy September 12, 2016last_img read more

Veterans Yoga Project fundraiser set for March 12 in Hoboken

first_img× HOBOKEN–Over 100 residents and yoga practitioners are expected to come together Sunday March 12 to raise money and awareness to support veterans and their families through a Veterans Yoga Project (VYP) fundraiser to be held at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken.The fundraiser offers participants a chance to meet Veterans Yoga Project founder Dr. Daniel Libby and learn how yoga and other VYP programs can help veterans and their families. Attendees can also enjoy a yoga class taught by veterans and light refreshments.All proceeds from the event will go to support the Veterans Yoga Project.Since its inception, the VYP has helped thousands of veterans and their families reduce stress, ease pain, and release traumatic imprints that negatively impact their lives through Mindful Yoga Therapy classes and multi-day retreats. The VYP also provides advanced training to yoga instructors so they can safely and effectively offer VYP services to veterans in their area.The VYP’s work is seen has having a significant and positive impact on veterans suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to depression and certain physical injuries. Participating veterans underscore the VYP’s benefits by reporting reduced stress, better sleep, enhanced concentration and the ability to better manage anger and aggression.“Supporting the Veterans Yoga Project is a great way to give back to veterans and their families, who have given all of us so much,” said Helene Graff, a co-founder of the event. “Coming to the event is more than just saying thank you. It is a way to help veterans and their families get their lives back on track.”The event is the third annual VYP fundraiser to be held in Hoboken. The first came in 2014 in response to a request from the group to conduct fundraisers nationally during Veterans Gratitude Week.The fundraiser will be held in Walker Gymnasium at Stevens Institute of Technology from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.Minimum asking donation is $25.Please register or donate at  www.tinyurl.com/vypcamaignTo learn more, please visit  www.veteransyogaproject.org.last_img read more