ONE WAY STATES CAN HELP STUDENTS LOAN BORROWERS

first_imgOne Way States Can Help Student Loan BorrowersDecember 14, 2015 By Sophie Quinton-The Pew Charitable Trusts Research & Analysis StatelineSen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat, lends his support to a bill that would allow the federal government to refinance student loans. As his home state shows, there’s plenty states can do to help borrowers in the absence of federal action.Ali Sinicrope and her husband would like to buy a house, but they’re not sure they can afford it. They’re public school teachers in Middletown, Connecticut, and they owe $80,000 in student loans.“It just adds up,” Sinicrope, 40, said of the $600 monthly payment her family strains to make. “That’s less money, now, that we can save toward a house, that’s less money that we can put toward our kids’ college tuition.”Connecticut lawmakers want families like the Sinicropes to spend less on student loan payments and more on everything else. Starting next year, the state will offer a refinancing program that’ll allow some borrowers to save money by lowering the interest rates on their loans.“The burden of this debt is a real millstone around the neck of our economy, and we need to address it,” said state Rep. Matt Lesser, a Democrat who represents Middletown. Almost 18 percent of Connecticut residents who have a credit file have student debt — $31,100, on average, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.Although the federal government dominates the student loan market, there’s much states can do to help borrowers who are struggling.States have long recruited doctors, dentists and teachers to underserved areas by promising to forgive or repay their student loans. Now, some states are establishing refinancing programs. Connecticut has gone further this year. Not only did Democratic Gov. Dannell Malloy sign a law creating a refinancing program, he also signed one that laid ground rules for student loan servicers and created a student loan ombudsman’s office that will advise borrowers.Such efforts won’t stop college costs from rising. The University of Connecticut’s trustees meet this week to decide whether to raise tuition by 31 percent over four years. The state flagship says it needs to boost tuition partly to offset reductions in per-student state funding.Lesser said lawmakers need to find ways to fund state higher education systems and slow tuition growth. But for many Americans, he points out, the damage already has been done.Nationwide, Americans owe about $1.3 trillion in student debt. Last year, 35 percent of student debt was held by borrowers over age 40, according to the New York Fed.How State Refinancing Programs WorkMost Americans rely on student loans to pay for bachelor’s degrees and graduate studies. In 2011, 68 percent of students who’ve been in college for four or more years reported having taken out a student loan — primarily federal loans, according to the most recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics.A generation ago, many Americans got their federal student loans through states. Almost every state had an office that issued federally guaranteed loans. After the U.S. Department of Education began issuing loans directly in 2010, some state student loan authorities closed their doors.Eighteen states, including Connecticut, still issue student loans through their own student loan authorities (or in North Dakota’s case, a state bank), according to the Education Finance Council, a trade group. State agencies generally finance their loans by selling low-interest, tax-exempt bonds.Rhode Island’s student loan authority (RISLA) developed a refinancing program after listening to borrowers, said Charles Kelley, the agency’s executive director. People kept asking if there was anything the agency could do to reduce the interest on their loans, in the same way that banks can reduce the interest rate on a mortgage when interest rates fall, he said.It’s hard to get a better deal on a loan than a subsidized, federal undergraduate loan. Right now, they’re available at a 4.29 percent interest rate, and the federal government pays the interest while borrowers are in school. Loans for graduate students are pricier, as are federal parent loans. Private loans can be expensive, as can older federal loans, issued before the financial crisis.“We had people coming to us with federal parent loans that were 7.9 or 8.5 percent fixed,” Kelley said of the interest rates he saw. Borrowers with old loans issued by the Rhode Island agency also wanted to know if they could refinance.RISLA launched its program 18 months ago. So far, the authority has refinanced loans for 349 borrowers, primarily people who live in Rhode Island or went to college there. For now, it’s paying for the program with taxable bonds.Lauren, a Rhode Island teacher who didn’t want to disclose her last name because she’s revealing personal financial information, refinanced a private student loan through the program last year. “I’ve been repaying for seven years,” the 29-year-old said of her debt. She chose the lowest-cost option: a five-year loan that can have an interest rate as low as 4.24 percent.Seven states had approved or piloted a student loan refinancing program as of November, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The U.S. Treasury Department cleared the way for more states to adopt such a program last month, when it approved the use of tax-exempt bonds for student loan refinancing.For states that already have a student loan program, setting up a refinancing program costs next to nothing. RISLA didn’t need legislative approval to get started. Connecticut’s program, created by law earlier this year, will begin with a pilot funded by transferring $5 million from one of the student loan authority’s subsidiaries.But Who Will Benefit?State refinancing programs tend to be open to more borrowers than programs offered by banks or other private lending companies, said Debra Chromy, president of the Education Finance Council, a national association. Still, refinancing isn’t for everyone.Lenders have to be reasonably sure that borrowers will repay their loans. This year, a Goldman Sachs report estimated that about $211 billion in student loans could be eligible for refinancing. That’s a lot of money, but only enough to cover less than a fifth of outstanding student loans in the U.S.Unlike some private companies, the Rhode Island authority will work with borrowers who have missed a few loan payments. But its refinancing program does require borrowers to earn at least $40,000 a year and have a FICO credit score of at least 680. Nationally, most people under 30 have a FICO score below 700.And refinancing may not be the best option for all borrowers. Teachers like Lauren and the Sinicropes, for example, may be able to wipe out part of their debt obligation by qualifying for federal loan forgiveness, depending on where they teach and how long they plan to stay there.In Wisconsin, Republicans have resisted Democrats’ push to create a student loan refinancing authority. In May, Republicans on the Joint Finance Committee argued that students should consider whether their degrees will pay off before taking on debt, according to The (Madison) Capital Times. The head of the state Higher Educational Aids Board said establishing the program could create a false sense of security for students.Refinancing programs primarily benefit borrowers who are surviving without help. Think middle-class professionals like the Sinicropes, who took on debt to go to a private graduate school and are managing to stay on top of their payments.But surviving isn’t the same as thriving. Lauren from Rhode Island said she’s lucky she can afford to make her payments, but handing over the money still stings. “I just imagine all the things I could be doing with that money, and it makes me sick sometimes,” she said.“This is largely going to help people who are already paying their loans and have a strong credit record, but they might be able to save some substantial money — enough for them to pay a down payment to buy a home, or save up to start a small business,” said Rohit Chopra, former student loan ombudsman at the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.Ali Sinicrope estimates that it’ll be years before she and her husband have paid off their debt. Their education expenses probably won’t end there: in six years, their twin sons will graduate from high school. “That’s going to be two college tuitions at the same time,” she said. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Registration for Summer Recreation Programs Opens May 1

first_imgA brochure of 2021 Summer Recreation Programs in Ocean City is now available at www.ocnj.us/summer-recreation-programs.Registration will open online and in-person at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 1. Many of the programs are popular and fill up quickly, so participants are encouraged to take a look at what’s available in advance and be ready to sign up early on May 1.Online registration will be through the new RecDesk system (ocnj.recdesk.com). Anyone can create an account there to manage program and event registrations, as well as Aquatic and Fitness Center memberships.In-person registration will be available at the Ocean City Community Center (1735 Simpson Avenue), City Hall (861 Asbury Avenue), and the Ocean City Music Pier Welcome Center (Boardwalk at Moorlyn Terrace). Playground activities are part of the summer recreation program.last_img read more

Puratos unveils trio of bakery inclusions called Smoobees

first_imgBaking and ingredients supplier Puratos has unveiled new inclusions called Smoobees.Described as a “new sensorial, visual and taste experience”, Smoobees are essentially soft spheres of flavour that Puratos said offered taste and texture in every bite.They come in three flavours – blueberry, caramel and lemon, are suitable for vegans, and the fruit variants contain up to 30% fruit. They’re described as soft and creamy with a melt-in-the-mouth texture.Adding fillings, fresh fruit or other inclusions to cakes can often be technically challenging for manufacturers, Puratos added, citing the need for injection equipment, bake stability and more.As such, Smoobees are mix- and bake-stable inclusions, which offer manufacturers “a new creative playground to explore” without having to adapt production processes.“Our patisserie expertise and passion at Puratos means we have been able to adapt an idea which has its roots in molecular gastronomy, to the needs of patisserie producers,” said Victoria Forward, application specialist industrial patisserie, Puratos UK.“We have developed a uniquely creative and fun inclusion solution in Smoobees, which is light and airy, yet creamy and indulgent.”Smoobees have been developed following Puratos’ Taste Tomorrow research that found taste was the number one criteria for consumers when buying patisserie, pastry and chocolate, and texture was a key element of taste. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of respondents to the research said they liked trying food that offered a different mouthfeel.Puratos said Smoobees translated this trend into a real-world innovation for professional baking.last_img read more

Why do we get so picky about friendship late in life? Ask the chimps

first_img Uganda’s Kasiisi Project focuses on changing attitudes of schoolchildren Related A mother’s influence Looking at chimp’s future, seeing man’s Female chimps treat sticks as dolls Growing evidence for gender-specific play in humans Watching teeth growcenter_img Up-close research challenges connection between molar development, weaning in chimps The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. No new friends and no drama.When humans age, they tend to favor small circles of meaningful, established friendships rather than seek new ones, and to lean toward positive relationships rather than ones that bring tension or conflict. These behaviors were thought to be unique to humans but it turns out chimpanzees, one of our closest living relatives, have these traits, too. Understanding why can help scientists gain a better picture of what healthy aging should look like and what triggers this social change.The work is described in the Oct. 23 issue of the journal Science and is authored by a team of psychologists and primatologists, including current and former researchers from the Harvard Department of Human Evolutionary Biology.The study draws on 78,000 hours of observations, made between 1995 and 2016. It looked at the social interactions of 21 male chimpanzees between 15 and 58 years old in the Kibale National Park in Uganda. It shows what’s believed to be the first evidence of nonhuman animals deliberately selecting who they socialize with during aging.The researchers looked only at male chimpanzees because they show stronger social bonds and have more frequent social interactions than female chimps. Analyzing a trove of data, the researchers saw that the chimpanzees displayed much of the same behavior aging humans exhibit.The older chimpanzees they studied, for instance, had on average more mutual friendships while younger chimps had more one-sided relationships. Mutual friendships are characterized by behavior such as reciprocated grooming whereas in lopsided friendships grooming isn’t always returned.Older males were also more likely to spend more time alone and showed a preference for interacting with — and grooming — chimps they deemed to be more important social partners, like other aging chimps or their mutual friends. And like older humans looking for some peace and quiet, the chimpanzees showed a shift from negative to more positive interactions as they reached their twilight years. The preference is known as a positivity bias.,“The really cool thing is that we found that chimpanzees are showing these patterns that mirror those of humans,” said Alexandra Rosati ’05, an assistant professor of psychology and anthropology at the University of Michigan and one of the paper’s lead authors.Future research can help determine if these behaviors constitute the normal or successful course that aging should take, she added. It can serve as a model or baseline.“There’s really a pressing need to understand the biology of aging,” Rosati said. “More humans are living longer than in the past, which can change the dynamics of aging.”Rosati is a former assistant professor and visiting fellow in HEB department, where the study originated. Other Harvard-connected authors on the paper include Zarin Machanda, A.M. ’04, Ph.D. ’09, who’s now an assistant professor at Tufts University; Melissa Emery Thompson, A.M. ’00, Ph.D. ’05, who’s now an associate professor at the University of New Mexico; Lindsey Hagberg ’17, who’s now a medical student at Washington University; and Richard W. Wrangham, Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology and founder and co-director of the Kibale Chimpanzee Project.Machanda and Thompson worked in Wrangham’s lab as graduate students and currently serve as co-directors for the Kibale project, which has other authors on the paper including Martin N. Muller, a former postdoctoral fellow in HEB. The project started as Hagberg’s undergraduate senior thesis.The study tested the origins of humans prioritizing close, positive relationships during aging and whether that is really triggered by a theory known as socioemotional selectivity. The notion suggests that the central process driving social selectivity during aging is awareness that time is running out and wanting to make the best of what remains.The findings from the study suggest there is more to understand.“Even though chimps are very smart, they do not understand they’re going to die,” Wrangham said. “Much more likely something else is going on in chimps to explain why their relationships become more positive as they get older, and then the question is, is what applies to chimps the same as what applies to humans?”Big Brown is an older male in the Kanyawara chimpanzee group. Photo by John LowerSome of the observations that led the researchers to their conclusions included looking at proximity and grooming habits. Older chimps preferred sitting close to those who preferred sitting close to them. These are categorized as mutual friendships, while one-sided friendships are when one chimp prefers sitting close to another chimp but that other chimp doesn’t share that habit.Fifteen-year-old chimps had on average 2.1 one-sided friendships and 0.9 mutual friends while 40-year-old chimps almost didn’t bother with one-side friendships (their average was .6), but did have plenty of mutual friends, an average of three. By looking at grooming habits, the researchers then saw the older chimps devote more energy into their relationships with mutual friends. Study finds that mothers determine chimps’ lifelong grooming behavior “We see individuals having these more lopsided friendships and then as they age they start really spending time with individuals that reciprocate,” said Machanda, who was the paper’s other lead author. “When you have this kind of mutual friendship, you actually groom that individual more, so these older chimps have these mutual friendships and they’re actually grooming those individuals quite a bit. They’re really invested in these relationships.”The scientists weren’t entirely surprised by their findings. Part of it is because chimpanzees and humans are already a lot alike in terms of social organization and social choices. After all, chimpanzees, along with bonobos, share 99 percent of their DNA with humans.“It raises the possibility that we are seeing behavioral systems that have been shared evolutionarily back to our common ancestor, around seven or eight million years ago,” Wrangham said.This work was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, and the Leakey Foundation.last_img read more

Trail Mix: The Yonder Mountain String Band Experience

first_imgI admit to being a bit scatter brained. My fire is a bit too small for all of my irons, so to speak, and things seem to slip my mind. Just ask my wife. I have a hard time keeping up with my keys and wallet, regularly forget to switch the wet clothes from the washer to the dryer, and often don’t take anything out for dinner to thaw on the days it is my turn to cook.Thankfully, these are all rather innocuous things. No crisis ever stemmed from my misplaced keys. I tend to remember the significant things pretty well…most of the time.From a musical standpoint, this is especially true regarding when I was introduced to Yonder Mountain String Band. To this day, over a decade later, I can actually call to mind the view I had of the mountains leading up into Shenandoah National Park, just outside Charlottesville, Virginia, as I headed to a hike with my good buddy, Jason Collier, when Yonder’s second live record, Mountain Tracks: Volume Two, was tossed into the cd player. I was captivated.Long a fan of bluegrass and acoustic music, I knew immediately that I was being introduced to a new sound. I became swept up in both the band’s songwriting and energetic playing style. After hearing the “Peace of Mind->Follow Me Down To The Riverside->Peace of Mind” sandwich late in the disc, I knew I was hooked for good.Over the last ten years or so, I have managed to catch the band around a dozen times. I’ve traveled to distant states -– even on school nights, which is nearly scandalous for a school teacher like myself -– to hang out with other Kinfolk, the close knit family of Yonder fans that spans the country and travels en masse with the band while they are on the road. I’ve seen them at festivals and bars, in theaters and music halls, and traveled back home through a blinding snowstorm following a show, all because the live Yonder experience is really quite something.Knowing that my love for Yonder is shared by many, I reached out to some friends to chat about their favorite Yonder moments. Every Yonder fan has one. In fact, I think every Yonder fan has many. Here are just a few from Kinfolk from around the country:“Back during the very first Northwest String Summit in 2002, the guys were playing a workshop set on the second stage and someone in the crowd asked if the guys ever played other instruments. A moment later all four of them handed their instrument to another member of the band to play one song, but Jeff got Ben’s old upright bass and had NO clue how to play it. I’ve had nightmares about that ever since, being onstage and expected to play an instrument you’ve never played before, but all four of the guys performed “I’m Troubled” pretty well. I know all the guys are now multi-instrumentalists, but this was hysterically funny back then.” —Pastor Tim Christensen, Butte, MT “I saw the band the night the Red Sox won the World Series and broke the Curse of The Bambino. Starr Hill, now closed but a legendary room in the Charlottesville music scene, was packed the hilt. We’re talking squirming room only. The first set was HOT. The second set was HOTTER. During the second set, the crowd was raging as the World Series excitement kept pace with the band’s momentum. The floors were shaking and the people were getting rowdy. The band was feeding off both the energy from the crowd and the game. Yonder was on fiar the show reached a frantic, fever pitch. This was a small place, just a couple people, and it was insane. As “If You’re Ever In Oklahoma” began evolving into an unbelievably stratospheric jam that was timed perfectly with the last outs of the World Series, the place began erupting. I’d never felt energy like that before, and I doubt I ever will again. That night, Charlotteville Yonder fans had the ultimate pre-Halloween treat: a special show to cherish and remember forever.” —Jason Collier, Crozet, VA“I’ve been to many great Yonder shows. One that stands out as being over-the-top fun was at the All Good Music Festival in 2010. Widespread Panic opened for Yonder, who didn’t come on until the wee hours of the morning . . . maybe 2:30 A.M. or so. I was up front and on the rail the whole time. It was epic!” —Phil Graves, Waynesbrah, VA“The first time I saw Yonder was at a big rock club in Nashville. I had gone to see The Infamous Stringdusters, who were opening, but I stuck around for the whole show. When YMSB came out, I was immediately floored. There was a surge of energy from the crowd that didn’t let up for the rest of the night. It was incredible to see so many smiling faces dancing to bluegrass music in a cavernous club. I was standing next to a handful of old-school bluegrass fans at the start of the show, and I was able to see the looks on their faces change as they ‘got it.’ It was a great night for a bunch of reasons.” —Jeremy Darrow, Nashville, TN“My favorite moment was seeing Yonder at the Paramount Center in Bristol, Tennessee, as part of a taping for NPR’s Mountain Stage. The crowd went crazy when they came on stage. Several bands were playing, so I went next door during the intermission to have a drink. I sat down and ended up having the best chat with this cool cat that turned out to be Jeff Austin. You would have never known he was getting ready to go up on stage. We had a toast and I apologized for not recognizing him. Definitely one of the coolest guys I have ever met. I have never been let down at a show, so don’t miss out on the opportunity to see them if you have the chance.” —Kristin Ely Stanley, Wise, VA“Back in 2002, I threw a party in Gainesville, Florida, at this little farm called Shambhala. Yonder was set to play and we were anticipating a good turnout. The boys arrived as scheduled and it was my first experience talking with them and not just being a patron of a show. They were all super polite and very friendly. It was an outdoor show and it was super dark that night, and I remember Jeff Austin stating, ‘They’ve locked the gates and released the Gators!’ It turned into a rocking party with about 400 or so folks in attendance. Yonder played a Jimmy Buffet cover with the words mixed up to reference a specific herb, which was hysterical. I remember running into the house to keep flipping the blown breakers due to the large amount of current surging through the many extension cords! The night wrapped up with us giving each of the Yonder boys his own personal bottle of Jaegermeister, which we used to toast the night, and the entire party shared the liquor as it was passed around the crowd. It was an absolutely fantastic night and probably one of the best things I have ever done to make so many people so extraordinarily happy.” —Joe Kuhn, Whitehall, VAMy own favorite Yonder moment came at my most recent show, back in February of 2012 at the Tennessee Theater in Knoxville. It was a rare time that Yonder had an opening band, which happened to be The Infamous Stringdusters, another one of my favorite acoustic bands, and I took my oldest son, John Patrick, to the show. J.P. swears he doesn’t like bluegrass music, despite the fact that he plays guitar, dobro, and upright bass in a distinctly bluegrassy/folksy band, but on this night, I enjoyed very much watching him mesmerized by the music being made on stage. He had never really seen bluegrass done the Yonder way before, and I loved seeing him come to the realization that acoustic instruments could rock.Yonder has gone through a bit of an evolution over the last few months, as Jeff Austin, founding member and mandolin player, has left the band and embarked on a solo career. Undeterred, the remaining members of the band –- Adam Aijala, Ben Kaufmann, and Dave Johnston -– soldier on. Plans are to confirm a new and permanent line-up next year. For the time being, Yonder tours with Jake Jolliff on mandolin and Allie Kral on fiddle.Yonder Mountain String Band will be stopping at The Jefferson Theater on Sunday, August 31.Trail Mix would like to offer you the chance to go catch the show. Take a shot at the trivia question below and email your answer to [email protected] A winner from all of the correct respondents will be chosen at noon on Friday, August 29th.Good luck! And please remember to email your answer, don’t comment here!Back in 2012, YMSB swung through Charlottesville, Va., with a guest guitarist because Adam Aijala had to miss the show. Who was that guest guitar picker?last_img read more

Celebrate National Bike to Work Day!

first_imgIn case you missed it, this is National Bike to Work Week, which culminates tomorrow with National Bike to Work Day. During National Bike to Work Day, participants across the Unites States saddle their cruisers, MTBs, road bikes, and hybrids and turn their morning commute into a statement by opting for two wheels instead of four.It’s a fitting celebration considering the recent rise in bike-friendly cities and bike commuting as a popular mode of transportation.40% of all trips in the U.S. are less than two miles, making bicycling a feasible and fun way to get to work.—The League of American BicyclistAlmost across the board in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, bike commuting has increased by leaps and bounds. That includes states like Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania, all of which have seen a spike in bike commuting to the tune of 100 percent or more. In Washington, D.C., bike commuting has skyrocketed, seeing a 498 percent increase since 1990. In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that same statistic sits at 296 percent, while Louisville, Kentucky has seen 149 percent growth in bike commuting since 1990.In most cases, the spikes in bike commuting directly corresponds with a city-wide trend toward establishing more bike-friendly infrastructure.With increased interest in healthy, sustainable and economic transportation options, it’s not surprising that, from 2000 to 2013, the number of bicycle commuters in the U.S. grew by more than 62 percent.—The League of American BicyclistIn order to facilitate the emergence of more bike-friendly cities, the League of American Bicyclist has established a merit-based system, which they’ve coined the BFA program or Bike Friendly America. You can see where your community ranks on the scale here.How will you celebrate National Bike to Work Day? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Amendments to the juvenile rules

first_imgAmendments to the juvenile rules December 15, 2005 Notices Amendments to the juvenile rulescenter_img Based on out-of-cycle proposals by the Florida Bar’s Juvenile Court Rules Committee, the Florida Supreme Court has adopted amendments to the Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure intended to conform the rules to recent legislation. Specifically, the court amended rules 8.010 (Detention Hearing); 8.013 (Detention Petition and Order); and 8.415 (Judicial Review of Dependency Cases), and forms 8.929 (Detention Order); 8.947 (Disposition Order—Delinquency); and 8.970 (Order on Judicial Review), and adopted new rule 8.355 (Administration of Psychotropic Medication to a Child in Shelter Care or in Foster Care When Parental Consent Has Not Been Obtained), and new forms 8.973 (Order on Judicial Review for Child Age 17 or Older), and 8.974 (Petition to Extend or Reinstate Court’s Jurisdiction). See In re: Amendments to the Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure, SC05-1303 (Fla. Nov. 17, 2005). The court invites all interested persons to comment on the amendments, which are reproduced in full below and can be found online in the court’s opinion at www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/2005/sc05-1303.pdf. An original and nine paper copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before January 17, 2006, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on Alan Abramowitz, Committee Chair, 210 N. Palmetto Avenue, Suite 440, Daytona Beach 32114-3269, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled in this case. Electronic copies of all comments also must be filed in accordance with the Court’s administrative order In re Mandatory Submission of Electronic Copies of Documents, Fla. Admin. Order No. AOSC04-84 (Sept. 13, 2004). IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA IN RE: AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA RULES OF JUVENILE PROCEDURE, CASE NO. SC05-1303 RULE 8.010. DETENTION HEARING (a) – (e) [No Change] (f) Issues. At this hearing the court shall determine the following: (1) – (2) [No Change] (3) The need to release the juvenile from detention and return the child to the child’s nonresidential commitment program. (g) [No Change] RULE 8.013. DETENTION PETITION AND ORDER (a) – (b) [No Change] (c) Order. The detention order shall: (1) – (3) [No Change] (4) order that the child shall be held in detention and state the reasons therefore ; , or, if appropriate, order that the child be released from detention and returned to his or her nonresidential commitment program ; (5) – (9) [No Change] RULE 8.355. ADMINISTRATION OF PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATION TO A CHILD IN SHELTER CARE OR IN FOSTER CARE WHEN PARENTAL CONSENT HAS NOT BEEN OBTAINED (a) Motion for Court Authorization for Administration of Psychotropic Medications. (1) Whenever the department believes that a child in its physical or legal custody requires the administration of a psychotropic medication, and the child’s parents or legal guardians have not provided express and informed consent as provided by law, the department or its agent shall file a motion with the court to authorize the administration of the psychotropic medication before the administration of the medication, except as provided in subdivision (c) of this rule. In all cases in which a motion is required, the motion shall include the following information: (A) The written report of the department describing the efforts made to enable the prescribing physician to obtain express and informed consent for providing the medication to the child and describing other treatments considered or recommended for the child; and (B) The prescribing physician’s signed medical report, as required by law. (2) The department must serve a copy of the motion, and notify all parties of its proposed administration of psychotropic medication to the child in writing, or by whatever other method best ensures that all parties receive notification of the proposed action, within 48 hours after filing the motion for court authorization. (3) If any party objects to the proposed administration of the psychotropic medication to the child, that party must file its objection within 2 working days after being notified of the department’s motion. (b) Court Action on Department’s Motion for Administration of Psychotropic Medication. (1) If no party timely files an objection to the department’s motion, the court may enter its order authorizing the proposed administration of the psychotropic medication without a hearing. Based on its determination of the best interests of the child, the court may order additional medical consultation or require the department to obtain a second opinion within a reasonable time, not more than 21 calendar days. When the court orders an additional medical consultation or second medical opinion, the department shall file a written report including the results of this additional consultation or a copy of the second medical opinion with the court within the time required by the court, and shall serve a copy of the report as required by subdivision (a)(2) of this rule. (2) If any party timely files its objection to the proposed administration of the psychotropic medication to the child, the court shall hold a hearing as soon as possible on the department’s motion. (A) At such hearing, the medical report of the prescribing physician is admissible in evidence. (B) At such hearing, the court shall ask the department whether additional medical, mental health, behavioral, counseling, or other services are being provided to the child that the prescribing physician considers to be necessary or beneficial in treating the child’s medical condition, and which the physician recommends or expects to be provided to the child with the medication. (C) The court may order additional medical consultation or a second medical opinion, as provided in subdivision (b)(1) of this rule. (D) After considering the department’s motion and any testimony received, the court may order that the department provide or continue to provide the proposed psychotropic medication to the child, on a determination that it is in the child’s best interest to do so. (c) Emergency Situations. (1) Shelter Care. When a child is initially removed from the home and taken into custody under section 39.401, Florida Statutes, and the department continues to administer a current prescription of psychotropic medication to the child, the department shall request court authorization for the continued administration of the medication at the shelter hearing. This request shall be included in the shelter petition. (A) The department shall provide all information in its possession to the court in support of its request at the shelter hearing. The court may authorize the continued administration of the psychotropic medication only until the arraignment hearing on the petition for adjudication, or for 28 days following the date of the child’s removal, whichever occurs first. (B) When the department believes, based on the required physician’s evaluation, that it is appropriate to continue the psychotropic medication beyond the time authorized by the court at the shelter hearing, the department shall file a motion seeking continued court authorization at the same time as it files the dependency petition, within 21 days after the shelter hearing. (2) When Delay Would Cause Significant Harm. Whenever the department believes, based on the certification of the prescribing physician, that delay in providing the prescribed psychotropic medication to the child would, more likely than not, cause significant harm to the child, the department must submit a motion to the court seeking continuation of the medication within 3 working days after the department begins providing the medication to the child. (A) The motion seeking authorization for the continued administration of the psychotropic medication to the child shall include all information required in subdivision (a)(1) of this rule. The required medical report must also include the specific reasons why the child may experience significant harm, and the nature and the extent of the potential harm, resulting from a delay in authorizing the prescribed medication. (B) The department shall serve the motion on all parties within 3 working days after the department begins providing the medication to the child. (C) The court shall hear the department’s motion at the next regularly scheduled court hearing required by law, or within 30 days after the date of the prescription, whichever occurs sooner. However, if any party files an objection to the motion, the court shall hold a hearing within 7 days. (3) In Emergency Psychiatric Placements. The department may authorize the administration of psychotropic medications to a child in its custody in advance of a court order in hospitals, crisis stabilization units, and in statewide inpatient psychiatric programs. Should the department do so, it must seek court authorization for the continued administration of the medication as required in subdivision (a) of this rule. RULE 8.415. JUDICIAL REVIEW OF DEPENDENCY CASES (a) – (e) [No change] (f) Court Action. (1) – (7) [No change] (8) If a youth in the legal custody of the department immediately before his or her 18th birthday petitions the court at any time before his or her 19th birthday requesting the court’s continued jurisdiction, the court may retain or reinstate jurisdiction for a period of time not to continue beyond the date of the youth’s 19th birthday. This continued jurisdiction is for the purpose of determining whether appropriate aftercare support, Road-to-Independence Scholarship, transitional support, mental health, and developmental disability services have been provided to the youth. (9) If a petition for special immigrant juvenile status and an application for adjustment of status have been filed on behalf of a foster child and the petition and application have not been granted by the time the child reaches 18 years of age, the court may retain jurisdiction solely for the purpose of allowing the continued consideration of the petition and application by federal authorities. Review hearings shall be set solely for the purpose of determining the status of the petition and application. The court’s jurisdiction shall terminate on the final decision of the federal authorities, or on the immigrant child’s 22nd birthday, whichever occurs first. ( 8 10 ) The court shall enter a written order on the conclusion of the review hearing including a statement of the facts, those findings it was directed to determine by law, a determination of the future course of the proceedings, and the date, time, and place of the next hearing. (g) [No Change] Committee Notes [No Change] FORM 8.929. DETENTION ORDER DETENTION HEARING ORDER Pick up order for absconding from: . …. home detention . …. probation . …. commitment . …. other:. …………….. Present before the court: . …. the child; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant State Attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant Public Defender/defense attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., parent/legal guardian; . ….. ….(name)….., DJJ juvenile probation officer; . ….. ….(name)….., Department of Children and Family Services . ….. ….(name)….., guardian ad litem DJJ Supervision status: . …. None . …. Home detention . …. Probation . …. Committed to. …. level . …. CINS/FINS . …. Conditional release Other court involvement: Dependency:. …. Yes. …. No. …. Unknown Domestic relations:. …. Yes. …. No. …. Unknown Domestic violence:. …. Yes. …. No. …. Unknown The court finds that the child was taken into custody at. …. a.m./p.m., on. ….(date)…… Probable cause that the child committed delinquent acts was: . … found. . …. not found. . …. reset within 48 hours of custody. Risk assessment instrument (RAI) score:. ……… Score amended to:. ……… . …. Meets detention criteria. IT IS ORDERED that the above-named child be: . …. released to the custody of. ….(name)…… . …. held in secure detention for domestic violence charge under section 985.213(2)(b)3, Florida Statutes. The court finds: . …. respite care is not available for the child; and . …. it is necessary to place the child in secure detention to protect the victim from injury. . …. detained by the Department of Juvenile Justice in . …. home detention. . …. home detention with electronic monitoring. . …. secure detention. with the following special conditions: . …. attend school regularly. . …. attend evaluation as follows: . …. physical. . …. psychological. . …. ADM. . …. other. ……………….. . …. no (….. harmful) contact with. ….(name)…… . …. drug testing. . …. no drug and alcohol use. . …. other:. ………………. ….. released from detention and returned to the child’s nonresidential commitment program. Reasons for court ordering more restrictive place­ment than RAI score:. ………………. It is FURTHER ORDERED that unless an adjudicatory hearing has begun or a subsequent modification order is entered, the child shall be released no later than 5:00 p.m. on. ….(date)….. to. ….(name(s))….., who is/are . …. the parent(s) . …. a relative . …. foster care . ….. ………………. program . ….. ….him/her….. self . …. other. ……………….. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED under section 985.2311, Florida Statutes . …. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $5 per day for each day the juvenile is in secure detention. . …. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $1 per day for each day the child is in home detention. . …. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, a REDUCED rate of $….. per day for each day the child is in detention status. This reduced fee is based on the court=s finding . …. that the parent/guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently detained and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense; or . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………. . …. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. . …. The. ….supervision fee/cost of care….. is WAIVED based on the court’s finding . …. that the parent/guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently detained and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense; or . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………. If the child’s case is dismissed or if the child is found not guilty of the charges or court order, then the parent/guardian shall not be liable for fees under this order. Unless modified by subsequent notice, the NEXT COURT APPEARANCE: . …. will be at. ….(time)….. on. ….(date)….. at. ….(location)……. . …. is to be set. Note: The child’s parent/legal guardian shall advise Clerk’s Office and DJJ of any address change. . …. Department of Juvenile Justice shall transfer the child to. ………………. Detention Center. . ….. Other:. ………………… DONE AND ORDERED in. ……………. County, Florida at. ……… a.m./p.m. on. ….(date)….. ___________ Circuit Judge Copies to:. ………………. FORM 8.947. DISPOSITION ORDER C DELINQUENCY DISPOSITION ORDER A petition was filed on. ….(date)….., alleging. ….(name)…..,. …. age, to be a delinquent child. The court finds that it has jurisdiction of the proceedings. Present before the court were: . …. the child; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant State Attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant Public Defender/defense attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., guardian; . ….. ….(name)….., DJJ juvenile probation officer. At the hearing on. ….(date)….., after. ….entry of a plea/an adjudicatory hearing….., the child was found to have committed the delinquent acts listed below: Count Count Count Count Charge. ………. ………. ………. ……… Lesser. ………. ………. ………. ……… Maximum. ………. ………. ………. ……… Degree. ………. ………. ………. ……… Guilty. ………. ………. ………. ……… Nolo contendere. ………. ………. ………. ……… Nolle prosse. ………. ………. ………. ……… Adjudicated. ………. ………. ………. ……… Adj. withheld. ………. ………. ………. ……… The predisposition report was. ….received and considered/waived by the child…… The court, having considered the evidence and comments offered by those present, having in­quired, and being otherwise fully advised in the premises ORDERS THAT: . …. Adjudication of delinquency is withheld. . …. The child is adjudicated delinquent and . …. committed to. ….a licensed child-caring agency/the Department of Juvenile Justice….. for placement in. ……… risk residential commitment program, for an indeterminate period, but no longer than the child’s. ….19th/21st….. birthday or the maximum term of imprisonment an adult may serve for each count listed above, except that a juvenile will not serve longer than six months in a nonresidential commitment program for a second degree misdemeanor, whichever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed in. ….home detention care. ….with/without….. electronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. placed in the serious or habitual juvenile offender program because the child meets the criteria in section 985.31, Florida Statutes. The placement shall be for an indeterminate period but no longer than the maximum sentence allowed by law or the child’s 21st birthday, which­ever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed on. ….home detention ….. with/without ….. elec­tronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. placed in a maximum risk program because the child meets the criteria in section 985.313, Florida Statutes. The placement is for an inde­terminate period of time but no longer than the maximum sentence allowed by law or the child’s 21st birthday, whichever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed on. ….home detention. ….with/without….. electronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. The court has orally pronounced its reasons for adjudicating and committing this child. . …. The court retains jurisdiction to accept or reject the discharge of this child from commitment, as provided by law. . …. The child is placed on post-commitment juvenile probation. . …. JUVENILE PROBATION: The child is. ….placed on/continued in….. juvenile probation under supervision of. ….the Department of Juvenile Justice/…..(name)….. for an indefinite period not to exceed the child’s 19th birthday or the maximum term of imprisonment an adult could receive for each count listed above, whichever comes first. . …. DISMISS: The case is dismissed. . …. Disposition on each count is. ….con­current/consecutive…… . …. This case disposition is. ….concurrent/consecutive…. with case number. ………. GENERAL CONDITIONS OF JUVENILE PRO­BA­TION. The child shall abide by all of the following conditions: 1. The child shall obey all laws. 2. The child shall be employed full-time or attend school with no unexcused absences, suspensions, or disciplinary referrals. 3. The child shall not change or leave. ….his/her…. residence, school, or place of employment without the consent of. ….his/her….. parents and juvenile probation officer. 4. The child shall answer truthfully all questions of. ….his/her….. juvenile probation officer and carry out all instructions of the court and juvenile probation officer. 5. The child shall keep in contact with the juvenile probation officer in the manner prescribed by the juvenile probation officer. 6. The child shall not use or possess alcoholic beverages or controlled substances. SPECIAL CONDITIONS OF JUVENILE PRO­BA­TION. The child shall abide by all of the conditions marked below: . …. Restitution is ordered. Parent and child are responsible,. …. jointly and severally. . …. Amount is reserved. . …. $………. to be paid to. ….(name)…… Payments shall begin. ….(date)….. and continue at the rate of $………. each month. . …. The court retains jurisdiction under Chapter 985, Florida Statutes, to enforce its restitution order, regard­less of the age of the child. . …. Community Service.. …. hours are to be per­formed by the child at the rate of. …. hours per month. Written proof is to be provided to the juvenile probation officer. . …. A letter of apology to be written by the child to. ….(name)….. within. …. days. The letter must be a minimum of. …. words. . …. A. …. word essay to be written by the child on. ….(subject)…. and provided to the juvenile probation officer within 30 days. . …. The child may have no. ……… contact with victim(s),. ….(name(s))…… . …. A. ….mental health/substance abuse….. evalu­a­tion to be completed by the child within. …. days. The child will attend and participate in every scheduled appointment and successfully attend and complete any and all recommended evaluations and treatment. . …. The parent(s). ….is/are….. to complete counseling in. ……… . …. A curfew is set for the child at. ……… p.m. Sunday through Thursday and. ……… p.m. Friday and Saturday. . …. The child’s driver’s license is. ….suspended/revoked/withheld….. for. ….(time period)…… . …. The child is to complete a. ….detention/jail/prison…. tour within. ….. days. . …. The child will be subject to random urinalysis. . …. The child will be electronically monitored. . …. The child will successfully complete all sanctions of the original juvenile probation order. . …. Other:. ……………………………………………………. . … The child must pay court costs of $…… GUN CHARGES . …. The court finds that one of the above charges involves the use or possession of a firearm and further ORDERS the following: . …. The child’s driver’s license is. ….suspended/revoked….. for …… 1/2. ….. years. . …. The child is to serve. ….5/10…. days in the Juvenile Detention Center. THE COURT FURTHER FINDS AND ORDERS: . …. The child has violated Chapter 794, Florida Statutes (sexual battery) and is ordered to make restitution to the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund under section 960.28(5), Florida Statutes, for the cost of the forensic physical examination. . …. The child. ….has been adjudicated delinquent/has entered a plea of no contest/has entered a plea of guilty….. to an offense under Chapter 794 or 800, sections 782.04, 784.045, 810.02, 812.133, 812.135, Florida Statutes, or any other offense specified in section 943.325, Florida Statutes, and the child is required to submit blood specimens under section 943.325, Florida Statutes. . …. Under section 985.231(1)(b), Florida Statutes: . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $5 per day for each day the child is in residential commitment. . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $1 per day for each day the child is on probation , nonresidential commitment, or conditional release. . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, a REDUCED fee of $….. per day for each day the child is in the custody of or supervised by the department. This reduced fee is based on the court’s finding: . …. that the parent/legal guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently before the court and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense. . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. …………………………. . …. The cost of care/supervision fee is WAIVED based on the court’s finding: . …. that the parent/legal guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently before the court and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense. . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………………….. . …. The parent/guardian,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The parent/guardian,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The child is placed on notice that the court may modify the conditions of. ….his/her…. juvenile probation at any time and may revoke the juvenile probation if there is a violation of the conditions imposed. The parties are advised that an appeal is allowed within 30 days of the date of this order. DONE AND ORDERED in. ….(city)…..,. ……… County, Florida on. ….(date)….., at. …. a.m./p.m. _____________ Circuit Judge Copies to:. ………………. FORM 8.970. ORDER ON JUDICIAL REVIEW ORDER ON JUDICIAL REVIEW AND NOTICE OF NEXT HEARING THIS CAUSE came on to be heard on. ….(date)….. for Judicial Review on the report filed by. ….the Depart­ment of Children and Family Services in this cause under chapter 39, Florida Statutes. The following persons appeared before the court: . ….. ….(Name)….., Petitioner . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for the petitioner . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for the department . ….. ….(Name)….., Department caseworker . ….. ….(Name)….., Mother . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for mother . ….. ….(Name)….., Father of. ….(child)….. . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for father . ….. ….(Name)….., Guardian ad litem . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for guardian ad litem . ….. ….(Name)….., Legal custodian . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for legal custodian …… ….(Name)….., The child …… ….(Name)….., Attorney/Attorney ad litem for the child . ….. ….(Name)….., Other:. ………………. and the court having considered: . …. Judicial Review Social Study Report filed by the Department; . …. Statement/homestudy filed by the Department; . …. Report of the Guardian Ad Litem; . …. Case plan filed by the Department; . …. Statement by the Child’s Caretaker; ….. Whether or not the child is a citizen and, if the child is not a citizen, the steps that have been taken to address the citizenship or residency status of the child; . …. Other:. ………………. AND THE COURT having heard testimony and argument, and having been otherwise duly advised in the premises finds: 1. That the minor child(ren) who is/are the subject matter of these proceedings , was/were adjudicated dependent, continue to be dependent, is/are of an age subject to the jurisdiction of the court, and is/ a are resident(s) of the state of Florida. 2. The following parties were notified of this hearing and provided a copy of the documents filed for this hearing: . ….. ….(Name)….., Petitioner . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for the petitioner . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for the department . ….. ….(Name)….., Department caseworker . ….. ….(Name)….., Mother . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for mother . ….. ….(Name)….., Father of. ….(child)….. . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for father . ….. ….(Name)….., Guardian ad litem . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for guardian ad litem . ….. ….(Name)….., Legal custodian . ….. ….(Name)….., Attorney for legal custodian . ….. ….(Name)….., Other:. ………………. 3. The mother,. ….(name)…..: . …. did not appear and. …. was. …. was not represented by legal counsel; . …. appeared. …. with. …. without legal counsel and. …. was. …. was not advised of her right to legal counsel; knowingly, intelligently, and voluntarily. …. waived. …. did not waive her right to legal counsel; and . …. was. …. was not determined to qualify as indigent ; and . …. was. …. was not appointed an attorney. 4. The father,. ….(name)…..: . …. did not appear and. …. was. …was not represented by legal counsel; . …. appeared. …. with. …. without legal counsel and. …. was. …. was not advised of his right to legal counsel; knowingly, intelligently, and voluntarily. …. waived. …. did not waive his right to legal counsel; and . …. was. …. was not determined to qualify as indigent ; and . …. was. …. was not appointed an attorney. COMMENT: Repeat above for each father. 5. The department filed a judicial review report with the court on. ….(date)…… This judicial review report. …. is. …. is not in compliance with the statutory requirements. 6. The following parents/legal custodians were notified of their right to participate in the prep­aration of the case plan and to receive assistance from any other person in the preparation of the case plan:. ….(names of those notified)…… 7. The mother has complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks complied with)…… 8. The mother has not complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks not complied with)…… 9. The father,. ….(father’s name)….., has complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks complied with)…… 10. The father,. ….(father’s name)….., has not complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks not complied with)…… 11. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(explanation of visitation compliance)…… 12. The father,. ….(father’s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(explanation of visitation com­pliance)…… 13. The department. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(expla­nation of visitation compliance)…… 14. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered financial support for the child as follows:. ….(explanation of financial com­pli­ance)…… 15. The father,. ….(father’s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered financial sup­port for the child as follows:. ….(explanation of financial compliance)…… 16. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the department as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings com­pli­ance)…… 17. The father,. ….(father’s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the department as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings compliance)…… 18. The department. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the parents as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings compli­ance)…… COMMENT: Use 19, 20, 21, & 22 if child(ren) is/are not placed in the home of a parent. . …. 19. It is in the best interest of the minor child(ren) to be placed in the care and custody of. ….(placement ordered)…… . …. 20. Placement of the minor child(ren) in the care and custody of. ….(placement ordered)….. is in a setting which is as family like and as close to the home as possible, consistent with the child(ren)’s best interests and special needs. . …. 21. Return of the minor child(ren) to the custody of. ….(person(s) from whom child(ren) was/were originally removed)….. would be contrary to the best interest and welfare of the minor child(ren). The child(ren) cannot safely. ….remain. ….return home with services and removal of the child(ren) is necessary to protect the child(ren). . …. 22. Prevention or reunification services. …. were not. …. were indicated and are as follows:. ….(services indicated)…… Further efforts could not have shortened separation of this family because. ……………….. COMMENT: Use 23 if child (ren) remain ( s ) or is /are returned to the parent(s). . …. 23. The child(ren) can safely. …. remain with. …. be returned to. ….(parent( > ’ s)(s’) name(s))….. as long as he/she/they comply(ies) with the following:. ……………….. The safety, well-being, and physical, mental, and emotional health of the child(ren) is/ are not endangered by allowing the child(ren) to. …. remain. …. return home. THEREFORE, based upon the foregoing findings, it is hereby ORDERED AND ADJUDGED that: 1. The minor child(ren),. ….(name(s))….., be placed in the custody of. ….(name)….., under supervision of the department. 2. The judicial review report filed by the department is: . …. not accepted and a continuance was requested. . …. accepted by the court. 3. Other:. ………………… 4. All prior orders not inconsistent with the present order shall remain in full force and effect. 5. This court shall retain jurisdiction over this cause to enter any such further orders and as may be deemed necessary for the best interest and welfare of the minor child(ren). 6. This matter is scheduled for Judicial Review on. ….(date)….. at. ….(time)…… DONE AND ORDERED in. ………………., Florida, on. ….(date)…… __________________ Circuit Judge NOTICE OF HEARING The Juvenile Court hereby gives notice of hearing in the above-styled cause on. ….(date)….. at. …. a.m./p.m., before. ….(judge)….., at. ….(location)….., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard. In accordance with the Americans With Dis­abilities Act, persons needing a special accom­modation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the Court Admin­istrator no later than 7 days before the proceeding at. ….(telephone number)…… PLEASE BE GOVERNED ACCORDINGLY. Copies furnished to: ____________________________________ FORM 8.973. ORDER ON JUDICIAL REVIEW FOR CHILD AGE 17 OR OLDER ORDER ON JUDICIAL REVIEW FOR CHILD OVER AGE 17 AND NOTICE OF NEXT HEARING THIS CAUSE came on to be heard on. ….(date)….. for Judicial Review on the report filed by the Depart­ment of Children and Family Services in this cause under chapter 39, Florida Statutes. The following persons appeared before the court: ….. …..(Name)….., Child ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney/Attorney ad Litem for the Child ….. …..(Name)….., Petitioner ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for the petitioner ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for the department ….. …..(Name)….., Department caseworker ….. …..(Name)….., Mother ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for mother ….. …..(Name)….., Father of. ….(child)….. ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for father ….. …..(Name)….., Guardian ad litem ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for guardian ad litem ….. …..(Name)….., Legal custodian ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for legal custodian ….. …..(Name)….., Other:. ………………. and the court having considered: ….. Judicial Review Social Study Report filed by the Department; ….. If the child has reached the age of 17, written verification that the child: . …. Has been provided with a current Medicaid card and has been provided all necessary information concerning the Medicaid program; . …. Has been provided with a certified copy of his or her birth certificate; . …. Has a valid Florida driver=s license or has been provided with a Florida identification card; . …. Has been provided information relating to Social Security Insurance benefits, if the child is believed to be eligible; . …. Has received a full accounting if there is a Master Trust for the child; . …. Has been provided with information and training related to budgeting, interviewing, and parenting skills; . …. Has been provided with information related to the Road-to-Independence Scholarship, including applications forms; ….. Has been informed that if he or she is eligible for the Road-to-Independence Scholarship program, he or she may reside with the licensed foster family or group care provider with whom the child was residing at the time of attaining his or her 18th birthday or may reside in another licensed foster home or with a group care provider arranged by the department; . …. Has an open bank account and has been provided with banking skills; . …. Has been provided with information on public assistance and how to apply; . …. Has been provided a clear understanding of where he or she will be living on his or her 18th birthday, how living expenses will be paid, and what educational program the child will be enrolled in; ….. Has been provided with notice of his or her right to petition for the court’s continuing jurisdiction for one year after his or her 18th birthday, and with information on how to obtain access to the court; and ….. Has been encouraged to attend all judicial review hearings occurring after his or her 17th birthday. ….. Statement/homestudy filed by the Department; ….. Report of the Guardian Ad Litem; ….. A case plan, dated. ………, filed by the Department that includes information related to independent living services that have been provided since the child’s 13th birthday or since the date the child came into foster care, whichever came later; ….. Statement by the child=s caretaker; ….. Whether or not the child is a citizen and, if the child is not a citizen, the steps that have been taken to address the citizenship or residency status of the child; ….. Other:. ………………. AND THE COURT having heard testimony and argument, and having been otherwise duly advised in the premises finds: 1. That the minor child(ren) who is/are the subject matter of these proceedings was/were adjudicated dependent, continue to be dependent, is/are of an age subject to the jurisdiction of the court, and is/are resident(s) of the state of Florida. 2. The following parties were notified of this hearing and provided a copy of the documents filed for this hearing: ….. …..(Name)….., Child ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney/Attorney ad Litem for the Child ….. …..(Name)….., Petitioner ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for the petitioner ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for the department ….. …..(Name)….., Department caseworker ….. …..(Name)….., Mother ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for mother ….. …..(Name)….., Father of. ….(child)….. ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for father ….. …..(Name)….., Guardian ad litem ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for guardian ad litem ….. …..(Name)….., Legal custodian ….. …..(Name)….., Attorney for legal custodian ….. …..(Name)….., Other:. ………………. 3. The child has been given the opportunity to address the court with any information relevant to the child’s best interests. 4. The mother,. ….(name)…..: ….. did not appear and. …. was. …. was not represented by legal counsel; ….. appeared. …. with. …. without legal counsel and. …. was. …. was not advised of her right to legal counsel; knowingly, intelligently, and voluntarily. …. waived. …. did not waive her right to legal counsel; and . ….was. …. was not determined to qualify as indigent and . …. was. …. was not appointed an attorney. 5. The father,. ….(name)…..: ….. did not appear and. …. was. …was not represented by legal counsel; ….. appeared. …. with. …. without legal counsel and. …. was. …. was not advised of his right to legal counsel; knowingly, intelligently, and voluntarily. …. waived. …. did not waive his right to legal counsel; and ….. was. …. was not determined to qualify as indigent and . …. was. …. was not appointed an attorney. COMMENT: Repeat above for each father. 6. The department filed a judicial review report with the court on. ….(date)…… This judicial review report. …. is. …. is not in compliance with the statutory requirements. 7. The following parents/legal custodians were notified of their right to participate in the prep­aration of the case plan and to receive assistance from any other person in the preparation of the case plan:. ….(names of those notified)…… 8. The mother has complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks complied with)…… 9. The mother has not complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks not complied with)…… 10. The father,. ….(father=s name)….., has complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks complied with)…… 11. The father,. ….(father=s name)….., has not complied with the following tasks in the case plan:. ….(list tasks not complied with)…… 12. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(explanation of visitation compliance)…… 13. The father,. ….(father=s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(explanation of visitation com­pliance)…… 14. The department. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered visitation as follows:. ….(expla­nation of visitation compliance)…… 15. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered financial support for the child as follows:. ….(explanation of financial com­pli­ance)…… 16. The father,. ….(father=s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered financial sup­port for the child as follows:. ….(explanation of financial compliance)…… 17. The mother. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the department as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings com­pli­ance)…… 18. The father,. ….(father=s name)…..,. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the department as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings compliance)…… 19. The department. …. has. …. has not complied with court ordered meetings with the parents as follows:. ….(explanation of meetings compli­ance)…… COMMENT: Use 20, 21, 22 & 23 if child(ren) is/are not placed in the home of a parent. ….. 20. It is in the best interest of the minor child(ren) to be placed in the care and custody of. ….(placement ordered)…… ….. 21. Placement of the minor child(ren) in the care and custody of. ….(placement ordered)….. is in a setting which is as family like and as close to the home as possible, consistent with the child(ren)=s best interests and special needs. ….. 22. Return of the minor child(ren) to the custody of. ….(person(s) from whom child(ren) was/were originally removed)….. would be contrary to the best interest and welfare of the minor child(ren). The child(ren) cannot safely. …. remain. …. return home with services and removal of the child(ren) is necessary to protect the child(ren). ….. 23. Prevention or reunification services. …. were not. …. were indicated and are as follows:. ….(services indicated)…… Further efforts could not have shortened separation of this family because COMMENT: Use 24 if child(ren) remain(s) or is/are returned to the parent(s). ….. 24. The child(ren) can safely. …. remain with. …. be returned to. ….(parent(’s)(s=) name(s))….. as long as he/she/they comply(ies) with the following:………………… The safety, well-being, and physical, mental, and emotional health of the child(ren) are not endangered by allowing the child(ren) to. …. remain. …. return home. ….. 25. The child’s petition and application for special immigrant juvenile status or other immigration decision remains pending. ….. 26. The department ….. has ….. has not complied with its obligation as specified in the written case plan or in the provision of independent living services as required by Florida Statutes. THEREFORE, based upon the foregoing findings, it is hereby ORDERED AND ADJUDGED that: 1. The minor child(ren),. ….(name(s))….., be placed in the custody of. ….(name)….., under supervision of the department. 2. The judicial review report filed by the department is: ….. not accepted and a continuance was requested. ….. accepted by the court. 3. Other:. ……………… 4. All prior orders not inconsistent with the present order shall remain in full force and effect. 5. This court shall retain jurisdiction over this cause to enter any such further orders as may be deemed necessary for the best interest and welfare of the minor child(ren). ….. 6. This court shall retain jurisdiction until the final decision is rendered by the federal immigration authorities, or upon the immigrant child’s 22nd birthday, whichever shall first occur. ….. 7. This court shall retain jurisdiction until the child’s 19th birthday for the purpose of determining whether appropriate aftercare support, Road-to-Independence Scholarship, transitional sup port, mental health, and developmental disability services have been provided to the youth. 8. This matter is scheduled for Judicial Review on. ….(date)….. at. ….(time)…… DONE AND ORDERED in. ………………., Florida, on. ….(date)…… ______________________ Circuit Judge NOTICE OF HEARING The Juvenile Court hereby gives notice of hearing in the above-styled cause on. ….(date)….. at. …. a.m./p.m., before. ….(judge)….., at. ….(location)….., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard. In accordance with the Americans With Dis­abilities Act, persons needing a special accom­modation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the Court Admin­istrator no later than 7 days before the proceeding at. ….(telephone number)…… PLEASE BE GOVERNED ACCORDINGLY. Copies furnished to: _______________ FORM 8.974 PETITION TO EXTEND OR REINSTATE COURT’S JURISDICTION PETITION TO EXTEND JURISDICTION OR TO REINSTATE JURISDICTION AND TO SCHEDULE HEARING I,. ….(name, address, and date of birth)….. request the court, under section 39.013(2), Florida Statutes to ….. extend jurisdiction, or ….. reinstate jurisdiction, and to schedule a hearing in this matter. 1. I am currently or was on my 18th birthday in the legal custody of the Department of Children and Family Services. 2.. …. a. I am requesting that the court review the aftercare support, Road-to-Independence scholarship, transitional support, mental health services, and/or developmental disability services to the extent authorized by law. . …. b. A petition for special immigrant juvenile status has been filed on my behalf and the application will not be granted by the time I reach 18 years of age. WHEREFORE, I request this court extend or reinstate jurisdiction in this case and schedule a hearing as soon as possible. ____________________________________ . ….(name)….. . ….(address)….. . ….(phone number)…..last_img read more

Merchants and financial institutions need to lead on EMV education

first_imgby: Bobby KoscheskiEMV will require new payment processes that, while seemingly small to those instituting the change, require a shift in behavior that could feel monumental to consumers.While we won’t see a government-funded advertising campaign in the U.S. in support of the EMV rollout, merchants and banks can drive adoption and mitigate the impact by communicating with employees and customers now about the change. Such efforts should include:Timing – when the change will occurCard Design – what changes cardholders should expect with CHIP-enabled cardsBehavior – how the purchase process will change, specifically what consumers will do differently at the point of sale with the new cards and terminalsSecurity – why the change is taking place: to protect customers’ personal financial information and identityWhen EMV rolls out this fall in the U.S., consumers will insert their cards into payment terminals that will hold on to new chip-enabled cards until the transaction is finished processing. Some retailers may also require consumers to enter their PIN to complete the transaction depending on whether or not the issuing bank of the card has made PIN a requirement (it appears most are initially requiring chip and signature vs. chip and PIN). continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

I ain’t no criminal!

first_img 33SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John San Filippo John is the co-founder of OmniChannel Communications, Inc., a company that specializes in B2B marketing to community financial institutions. He started out in the savings and loan industry, but wisely … Web: www.omnichannelcommunications.com Details The circumstances of my life are in flux at the moment, so this seemed just as good a time as any to try my luck with another credit union. I tried moving from Giganto Bank to one of the big, local CUs in 2016 and it was a cluster. I came crawling back to Giganto in just a few months.How did I choose my new credit union this time? They can thank Dick’s Last Resort for my business. Several years ago, Dick’s gave me a carved-out coconut head coin bank and ever since, I toss all my spare change in the coconut head. When it gets full, I cash in what usually amounts to about $130 in various coins. The only thing is, I’ve grown weary of giving Coinstar an 11% cut just to do the counting. So of course, I went to the local CU that has coin counters in its lobbies.Kudos to this CU for streamlining the onboarding process. In my life, opening a checking account has been akin to buying a car – lots of paperwork and lots of misery and lots of time. However, I was in and out of my new CU in about 20 minutes. I found that amazing.During my enrollment, I mentioned to the gentleman who was helping me that one of my issues with my former CU was their archaic policies around mobile deposit. He never indicated to me that mobile deposit might be an issue at my new CU, too. Yet, the next day when I attempted to make an actual mobile deposit, the mobile app told me that it needed to verify my eligibility for mobile deposit. Then it told me that, nope, I’m not eligible.Not eligible? Moi? WTF?I immediately called the toll-free number and was informed that one is only granted the privilege of mobile deposit after 90 days. That may have been an appropriate policy in 2004, but today that’s just ridiculous. I suspect that the amount of check fraud prevented by this policy is pretty close to zero.This CU did earn back a little respect, though, albeit temporarily. The gentleman on the phone called the manager at my new branch and she agreed to waive this requirement as soon as she got done helping another member. That was pretty awesome – except that five days later, I seriously doubt that she’s still helping that other member.Separately, someone recently gave me a $10,000 handwritten check to repay some money I had loaned them. Even I’m smart enough to know my new credit union is gonna put some sort of hold on that one. So I went to the other person’s bank to cash the check. Although they were very accommodating, it was a small branch and they didn’t really want to part with that much cash. I said, no problem, a cashier’s check will work just fine. Or so I thought.When I got to my credit union branch, I was told that because I was a new member, there would be a two-day hold on my cashier’s check. I objected and the branch manager (who may have been the one who was supposed to release my mobile deposit hold) agreed to release half if the teller could call the other bank and make sure my cashier’s check was legit.Think about that for a minute. Certified funds, verified with the issuing bank, and I get access to half? What kind of BS is that?My advice to all credit unions: If you really want new members, STOP TREATING THEM LIKE CRIMINALS!last_img read more

If George Clooney was a house, apparently this would be it

first_imgThe rear of the home. See the rest of the pictureshere.That said, this home which is being marketed by Hoch & Wilkinson is certainly still worth a look if you’re in the Isaac region north of Emerald. It comes loaded with airconditioning, a dishwasher, a second toilet and sits on an extra large 1,077sq m block.It was described as having “the stunning appeal of yesteryear — the strength and wisdom of a property that has endured and survived the harsh and unpredictable elements, yet retained its elegance and appeal”.Do let us know if you happen to discover first-hand what the charm is and if this home really does have that elusive Clooney-esque “je ne sais quoi”. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK HOLLYWOOD, CA – FEBRUARY 24: Actor George Clooney arrives at the Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 24, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images) annettepixA QUEENSLAND home is being touted as the property equivalent of Hollywood star George Clooney … but we’re not so convinced.The property at 20 Daintree Street, Clermont, which is apparently bringing sexy back to homeliness, has hit the market for $360,000 — that’s around 0.05 per cent of the debonair actor’s net worth.Here’s how the listing described it: “It is the property equivalent of George Clooney … old, but seriously sexy”. In Clermont this is quite possibly the height of sexiness.center_img Bromance: George Clooney and Brad Pitt were both declared sexiest man alive in difference years.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market20 hours agoOkay, sure, this four bedroom, single bathroom house may well have a certain “something-something”, but George Clooney is not old. The man who was declared the sexiest man alive 21 years ago is two months shy of his 57th birthday, and just two years older than Brad Pitt who held the same title 23 years ago.If George Clooney and Brad Pitt were houses, we’re just not certain they’d be Queenslanders. Maybe beachside California bungalows, or penthouses. Plus they’re both about 30 years younger than this house.last_img read more